Mill Lane, Beckermet, Cumbria, CA21 2YD

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Beckermet C of E Primary School

The building blocks for a bright future

Welcome to Year 5 and 6

Home Learning

Please check this class page regularly to see home learning resources I will be posting for completion at home. I will post some specific activities for children to complete as a minimum and some general resources for children to engage with additional to these. For those who do not have access to a printer, please complete activities in an exercise book, notebook or on paper. Please remember to note down the date at the top of the page. A letter will be sent out with my email address on it so that you can contact me to keep in touch with any questions. 

Earlier in the week I signed year 5/6 up to Classroom Secrets for Kids. Each child has their own individual login to access this learning platform. 

Children have an individual login for Times table Rockstars and Prodigy. These are two fantastic learning platforms. I will log on to these sites regularly to monitor how much children are using them. 

Here are some resources for children to engage with at home: 

  • Year 5 home learning guidance, activity booklet, practical ideas and answers from Classroom Secrets. Please note that the activities in the activity booklet are of varying challenge. D=Developing, E=Expected and GD=Greater depth
  • Year 6 home learning guidance, activity booklet, practical ideas and answers from Classroom Secrets. Please note that the activities in the activity booklet are of varying challenge. D=Developing, E=Expected and GD=Greater depth
  • Here is a link to the Twinkl home learning page. Parents are able to create an account and download these for free. Please keep checking the 'useful websites' page on this websites for more helpful pages.  
  • Joe Wicks The Body Coach is going to be doing a 30 minute live PE video on his youtube channel. He's going to be doing it every morning at 9am Monday-Friday. This will be great! Click here to find out more. 
  • Pobble 365 is a fantastic website to stimulate some creative writing. Each day an interesting image is added with some questions for children to answer. 
  • Daily ten is a fantastic mental maths activity for children to do. Children select a level and an area of maths to work on and away they go! 
  • Elevenses with the world of David Walliams - every day at 11am you can listen to one of David Walliams' World's Worst Children stories, so sit down, take a break, and enjoy 20ish minutes of pure fun! Here is the link.

Aim to upload some work onto ClassDojo each day! Remember you can message me on there too. Well done to those of you who have already started using ClassDojo! 

Friday 20th May 2020

Good morning and happy Friday! I just want to say how incredibly proud I am of how you are all working and you all deserve to have a fun and restful half term next week! 

Clapping hands icon By vectortatu | TheHungryJPEG.com A big clap for you! 

Today's spelling test day, so have one last run through of them and ask an adult to test you on them. Remember to write them in full sentences. 

Have a look at today's collective worship from Mrs Birkett on the school ClassDojo page. 

Lots of your are outside doing lots of exercise in lots of different ways which is great! What are you going to do today? Post a picture of yourself doing something active on ClassDojo! 

Keep listening to me reading our class book. The videos are on ClassDojo on your year groups page. I'm loving it so far! 

Can You See Me? by Libby Scott, Rebecca Westcott | Waterstones  

I'm going to try and catch up with my reading over half term. I've got so many books I haven't read yet. What are you reading at the moment? Show me a picture of your book on ClassDojo and tell me a bit about it. If you need some inspiration have a look at the Book trust's list of best 100 books for 9-11 year olds. I've also heard great things about the new David Walliams book! 

 

English: Today we are going to bring our booklet work to a close with some creative writing. 

Year 5: Booklet. Yesterday you planned your writing and today it's time to write a brand new finding tale! There are some instructions for you to make a book out of an A4 piece of paper at the end of the booklet. Remember to check your work. I can't wait to read what you've came up with! Complete the evaluation on the last pages. 

Year 6: Booklet. Yesterday you planned your portal stories and today is the day to write them. Read page 16 and off you go! I can't wait to read what you've came up with! Remember to check your work. Complete the evaluation on the last pages. 

 

Maths: Spend around 15 minutes on Times table rockstars to try and improve your scores. Why not arrange a duel with someone in your year group? Alternatively play on Prodigy as your warm up. 

Year 5: Today we are going to think about the nets 3D shapes. Have a go at this game where you need to decide which nets will make a cube. Matching activity. Choose a 3D shape and have a go at making a net for it out of a piece of paper. 

Year 6: Today we are going to look at angles in a quadrilateral. Remember that a quadrilateral is a shape that has four sides and interior angles. The angles in a quadrilateral add up to 360 degrees.

Angles in a quadrilateral - YouTube Have a go at working out angle x

There are relationships between angles in some quadrilaterals. Have a look at this poster. Consider these questions: Is a rectangle a parallelogram? Is a parallelogram a rectangle? What do you notice about the opposite angles in a parallelogram? Is a square a rhombus? Is a rhombus a square? What do you notice about the opposite angles in a rhombus? What is the difference between a trapezium and an isosceles trapezium?

Have a go at this activity. Check the missing angles and then check they add up to 360 degrees. 

 

Science: Today we are going to look at the life cycle of a bird. Birds lay eggs and if these eggs are fertilised beforehand, they will contain the bird embryo. This embryo will develop inside the egg until it is ready to hatch. The chicken eggs that people eat are not fertilised, so they do not contain baby chickens. However, we can explore chicken eggs to find out more about them. Can you name any parts of an egg already? Ask a parent if you can use an egg. Once you’ve got an egg have a close look at the outside of the egg. What is this part called? What is it for? Now crack your egg open over a bowl so you don’t make a mess. What can you see? What are the function of each part? Can you identify the following parts in the egg you've cracked? 

 

Can you put these parts of a bird’s life cycle in the right order?

  • The egg hatches and the adults provide food for the chick.
  • A fertilised egg is laid by the female.
  • The young bird leaves the nest and continues to grow into an adult.
  • The adults mate and reproduce.
  • The chick grows and develops.

Think about the types of birds and think about which is your favourite. Use the bullet points to help you to draw its life cycle in your book.

We have reached the end of our topic. Can you write some sentences in your books that compare the life cycles of plants and animals?

 

Thursday 19th May 2020

Good morning! I hope you all enjoyed the beautiful weather yesterday, fingers crossed we get some more today and next week when it's half term! 

Don't forget we have a class Zoom today at 4pm. Hope to see you there! Ask your parents to check their email for the link and password. We will play a couple of games and have a show and tell session. If you have anything special to quickly show have it ready! 

Keep going with your weekly spelling activities ready for an adult to test you on them tomorrow. 

I'm sure lots of you were in the garden doing something physical yesterday or maybe you went for a walk or bike ride. What are you going to do today? 

Have a look at today's collective worship on the main school ClassDojo page, some lovely things to think about each day! 

I hope you're all following our class story by watching the videos on ClassDojo! 

 

English: Today is planning day for both year 5 and 6 ready for tomorrow which is writing day. This will finish these booklets off nicely just in time for half term! 

Year 5: Booklet. Tomorrow you are going to write your very own 'finding' tale similar to 'The Game' which includes the features you've looked at in the story. Use the grids to help you come up with new ideas pages 19-22. You need to think carefully about your description - adverbs and adjectives. What will your object be? What will the threat be in your story? What will you setting be? Your characters? You've got lots to think about today but if you use the grids you'll plan a fantastic story. 

Year 6: Booklet. Tomorrow you are going to write you very own portal story including the features you've learnt such as: semi-colons, idioms, adverbs (position). Have a look at pages 14 and 15 today. Look carefully at the pattern of the story and read the story ideas given in the grid. Now plan your own portal story using the same pattern and structure.

 

Maths: Here is a times table and inverse challenge to get you warmed up. Choose either 1-8 times tables or 1-15 times tables. Remember to time yourselves and use a calculator or ask an adult to check. 

Year 5: Well done on your work on regular and irregular polygons yesterday. Today you're going to need a sharp pencil and a ruler because we are going to be doing some accurate drawing. Have a look at your ruler and remind yourselves how many millimetres (mm) are in a centimetre (cm). 

In your books, draw the following lines accurately to within the nearest mm: 

0.8cm, 4.6cm, 18.9cm, 12mm. 

Now draw four squares. One with sides 2cm, one with sides 4.6cm, one with sides 70mm, and one with sides 13mm. 

Now draw four equilateral triangles, meaning each side is the same length. One with sides 9cm, one with sides 114mm, one with sides 1cm and one with sides measuring 13cm. 

Now draw a regular hexagon, with sides measuring 4cm. 

Now draw a regular pentagon, with sides measuring 60mm. 

Year 6: We are going to continue working on angles and triangles. We are going to use our knowledge to solve missing angle problems. Look carefully at this image of a triangle:Remote Interior Angles: Definition & Examples - Video & Lesson ... We can see that angle a, b and c are the INTERIOR angles. Angles d, e and f are the EXTERIOR angles. Angles a, b and c will total 180 degrees. The exterior angles d, e, and f total 360 degrees.

Exterior Angles of a Triangle (solutions, examples, videos)

If we remember that the angles on a straight line equal 180 degrees and the angles in a triangle add up to 180 degrees, then we can work out missing angles. Look at these examples: 

Find the missing angle in a triangle (examples, solutions, videos ... You can work out the top left one by doing 180 - 70 - 45 degrees to find missing angle x. You can work out the top right one in the same way, knowing that this is an isosceles triangle so x and x are the same size. When we look at the bottom left example, we need to work out what angle y is first, then use this to work out what x is. Can you have a go at working out the missing interior and exterior angles on the bottom two triangles? 

Here is your activity. Here is a challenge extension. 

 

Benin topic: We are going to continue with our Benin topic today. We gained an understanding of how the Kingdom of Benin came to be yesterday. Have a go at this quick quiz to test what you can remember. Today we are going to gain an overview of the societal structure of Benin. 

Benin was a large and varied kingdom. Some people lived in villages and small towns, but most people lived and worked in Benin City.

The most important person in the kingdom was the king, known as the Oba. Hundreds of men and women lived at the royal court, and devoted their lives to looking after the Oba and his family. Some people at court had very special jobs, working as acrobats, sorcerers or leopard hunters.

The people of Benin believed that their Oba was a god. He lived apart from the ordinary people inside the royal court in Benin City.

Most of the time the Oba was kept very busy with his duties as king. He held meetings with his officials and he led religious ceremonies. But he also had some free time to spend with his family. Obas had many wives, and all their wives and children lived in special apartments inside the palace.

The Oba owned all the land in his kingdom. He gave orders to his chiefs on how his kingdom should be run and he decided when his armies should go to war. Sometimes he rode into battle at the head of his troops.

Everyone had to show great respect to the Oba. People approached him on their knees and nobody could look at him without his permission. Most people in Benin believed that the Oba didn’t need to eat or sleep!

The Oba relied on many chiefs and officials to help him run his kingdom. Palace chiefs ran the royal court, organised the craft workers and made agreements with European merchants. They came from rich families and their jobs were passed down from father to son. Town chiefs were chosen to do their jobs because they were good rulers. They governed the ordinary people.

 This brass plaque shows an Oba with his attendants. What can you interpret from this artefact? What does it tell us? Write down 3 observations and three questions. 

Another important figure was the mother of the Oba. The first great Queen Mother or 'Iyoba' was Queen Idia, the mother of Oba Esigie. She helped her son to defeat his enemies and gain control of the River Niger. As a reward, Esigie gave her a palace of her own.People believed that the Queen Mother had magical powers. She was not allowed to see her son after he became Oba, in case she used her magic to control him!

This ivory pendant of a Queen Mother probably shows Queen Idia. What can we infer from this artefact? Look very closely and write down three observations and three questions. 

Many people in Benin lived in villages in the rainforest. They cleared away the trees to grow vegetables and they built their houses from mud, wood and palm leaves. Most people in the countryside worked as farmers.

Some people made a living by being potters and blacksmiths. They made simple pots, weapons and tools for the villagers. Benin was famous for its craft workers. Specialists in a craft (like ivory-carvers) formed groups called guilds. All the members of a guild lived and worked together.

There were more than 40 guilds in Benin City and each guild had to perform a special duty for the Oba. Not all the guilds were for craft workers. Doctors, drummers, acrobats and dancers had their own guilds too.

Men from all over the kingdom served the Oba as soldiers. Warriors went into battle armed with swords, spears and crossbows, and by the 1600s they had guns as well. Some brave boys trained as hunters. They started their training very young and the bravest of all became elephant hunters.

 

If you lived in Ancient Benin, what job would you want to do? Remember to justify your answers. You could be a:

  •    Farmer
  •    Warrior
  •    Palace courtier
  •    Craft worker: potter, blacksmith, bronze worker...
  •    Merchant

Why would you want that job? What sills would you need? Why would you be good at it?

 

Now I want you to look at your timelines you made a couple of weeks ago and see what periods in British history took place 900-1800s alongside the Ancient Benin civilisation. Choose a period and compare and contrast what life was like in Benin and Britain at that time. For example, you might write down some similarities and differences between life in Tudor England and Benin. You might prefer to compare and contract Victorian times to Benin. Think about societal structure (things like who ruled), the people and jobs. It might be useful to imagine you are Dr Who travelling in your Tardis and you land in Britain and Benin in the same time period, what would you see? 

Wednesday 18th May 2020

Good morning and happy Wednesday! We're going to have another class Zoom tomorrow so ask your parents to check their emails for the invite. We are going to play some games and have a show and tell part. So if you have anything special you'd like to show and tell please have it ready. 

Have a listen to the next section of our class story 'Can you see me?' which is on your year group class page on ClassDojo. I hope you're enjoying it so far! 

Don't forget to have a look and see what today's collective worship is about via the school ClassDojo page. 

Spend 10-15 minutes completing a spelling activity to help you learn your weekly spellings. Someone did some great 'scrambling up' of the words the other day! 

Hopefully you're thinking about what you'll do to keep your body fit today. Even Winnie the Pooh knew how important exercise is. 

 

English: You are going to continue working on your booklets today. 

Year 5: Booklet. You are going to complete pages 16-18 today. You first need to play an adjective game, which encourages you to think carefully about how you can change the mood of your writing with your choice of adjectives. You then need to go onto change the verbs in the sentences given to make the spider even scarier. On page 17 and 18 you need to think about the problem in the story 'The Game' and come up with alternative ideas. 

Year 6: Booklet. You are going to complete activity 8 today, which encourages you to think carefully about character. You first need to come up with a character and answer questions on them. Now you need to write a short piece of descriptive writing based on seeing a mysterious door through the eyes of your character. Then you need to read the example from 'The Snow Walker's son' and use the model to structure a description from the perspective of your character when they come across a mysterious door. 

 

Maths: 

Year 5: Today we are going to think about irregular and regular polygons. First let's remind ourselves of what a polygon is. A polygon is a shape that has at least three straight sides and angles. Have a look at the shapes below and work out which ones are/are not polygons:

Identify Polygon or not a Polygon | Identifying polygons, Regular ... 

Now we need to think about what 'regular' means. Regular means that all sides and angles in a shape are equal. Can you list any regular polygons? Here is your activity. 

Year 6: We are going to continue to think about angles in triangles today. Here is a triangle:Triangles (Pre-Algebra, Introducing geometry) – Mathplanet

The little line on each side are called hatch marks which indicate equal lengths. The hatch marks on this triangle tell us that all sides are of equal length and so it is an equilateral triangle. If the angles in a triangle add up to 180 degrees, and this is an equilateral triangle, what is the size of each angle?

Questions on Isosceles Triangle Property - Teachoo - Equilateral and I The hatch marks on this triangle tell us there are two equal sides and so this is an isosceles triangle. How can you use this information to work out angle x?

Here is your activity. There are two problem solving questions to have a go at also. 

 

 

Benin topic: It would be useful if you dedicated a page in your book as a 'Benin topic vocabulary' page, as we are going to come across lots of it as we move through our Benin topic. As you encounter new vocabulary add this to your vocab page with a definition. There'll be plenty on this page today! You might want to 'box off' a key fact section also. 

We have got so many fascinating things to learn about the Kingdom of Benin. Firstly we need to gain an overview and understanding of how the Kingdom of Benin developed. Read this information carefully: 

The kingdom of Benin began in the 900s when groups of Edo people began to settle and make clearings in the rainforests of West Africa. At first they lived in small family groups, but gradually these groups developed into a kingdom. The kingdom was called Igodomigodo. It was ruled by a series of kings. The rulers of the first kingdom were known as Ogisos, which means ‘rulers of the sky’. In the 1100s there were struggles for power and the Ogisos lost control of their kingdom. The Edo people feared that their country would fall into chaos, so they asked their neighbour, the King of Ife, for help. The king sent his son Prince Oranmiyan to restore peace to the Edo kingdom. Oranmiyan chose his son Eweka to be the first Oba (king) of Benin. Eweka was the first in a long line of Obas, who reached the peak of their power in the 1500s. The Obas lived in beautiful palaces decorated with shining brass. Gradually, the Obas won more land and built up an empire. They also started trading with merchants from Europe. For 400 years Benin was very successful, but in the 1600s the Obas started to lose control of their people. By the 1800s Benin was no longer strong or united. The kingdom came to a sudden end in 1897, when a British army invaded and made it part of the British Empire. 

A bronze statue of Prince OranmiyanThis brass figure is believed to be Prince Oranmiyan. Edo legend says that no one in Benin had ever seen a horse before Oranmiyan arrived!

When does a kingdom become a kingdom? (HINT: Look up the definition of kingdom in a dictionary) 

This document has a quick quiz and a box of events to number as they happened; the first one has been done for you. 

In your books, write a short recount of the foundation of the Kingdom of Ancient Benin. Here is some vocabulary to include and some sentence starters (you don't have to use them all!) : 

  

 

French: Today we are going to think about French vocabulary for colours and animals. We are going to be using the book 'Petit Poisson Blanc' for the next few weeks. Click here for an introduction and instructions on what to do. 

French colour word mat

French animal cards

Tuesday 17th May 2020

Good morning! I hope you are busy thinking about how you will stay active today, remember there's always Joe Wicks if you can't get out in the garden or on a walk with your family. 

Have a listen to the next section of our class story 'Can you see me?' which is on your year group class page on ClassDojo. 

Don't forget to have a look at today's collective worship from Mrs Birkett via the school ClassDojo page. 

Spend 10-15 minutes completing a spelling activity to help you learn your weekly spellings. 

 

English: 

Year 5: Booklet. Today you are going to complete pages 14 and 15, which is all about relative clauses. Relative clauses are used to give extra information about a noun. They are introduced by a relative pronoun like 'that', 'which', 'who', 'whose', 'where' and 'when'. Watch this clip to refresh your memories. In the booklet, you need to play a 'drop in' game, where you drop in a relative clause to the sentence.  

Year 6: Booklet. You are going to complete activity 7 today on pages 10-11 which focuses on grammar and sentence work. You first need to read the examples of 'power of three' and then have a go at writing your own sentences in this way. Remember your commas. Then you need to consider Catherine Fisher's use of semi-colons instead of a conjunctions. You then need to come up with your own examples. The next parts are about adverbs and how their position can move in a sentence and the impact of this.

 

Maths: 

Year 5: We are going to look at angles in shapes today. Below is a square. I know that a square has four right angles of 90 degrees so angle a, b, c and d are all 90 degrees. 

Illustrative Mathematics  If I fold this square in half I will get two triangles. Square root of 2 and Pythagoreans' shock 

 

Triangles - Right Angled Triangle Shape - 520x520 PNG Download ...If I look at one of the triangles it has a 90 degree right angle and two other angles which are half a right angle. Half of 90 degrees is 45 degrees. So the angles in this triangle are 90 degrees, 45 degrees and 45 degrees. 

Have a go at this activity. Use your knowledge that a right angle is 90 degrees and half a right angle is 45 degrees. There is a very tricky problem solving challenge also. 

 

Year 6: Today we are going to look at different types of triangles and the interior angles within triangles. If we think about the word triangle it is tri (which means 3) and angle. It is important that we understand and remember that the interior angles of a triangle add up to 180 degrees. I have done an investigation to prove it. Click here to see a picture of a random scalene triangle I drew. After drawing the triangle I cut the triangle out and tore off each of its corners. When I put the triangles interior angles together they made 180 degrees just as angles at a point on a straight line add up to 180 degrees. Have a go at doing this yourselves by drawing each of the different types of triangles below and ripping off their interior angles. When you put the three angles together they should equal 180 degrees. 

Classifying Triangles | Classifying triangles, Homeschool math ...

It is important you can remember and recognise these four types of triangles. It is easier to remember right angled triangles and equilateral triangles because of their names but less so for isosceles and scalene. I remember isosceles triangles because the first part sounds like 'ice' and we use two feet when ice skating. I think of a snake to remember scalene triangles because it starts with an s and snakes slither in different directions and different angles. You might think of your own way of remembering the different types of triangles. 

Have a go at this activity. There are two tricky problem solving questions to complete (with answers). 

 

RE: Christians believe that the Holy Sprit is given as a gift so that they may help and benefit others in their lives. One of the 'fruits' of the Holy Sprit is kindness which links in well with the theme of mental health week.  I want you to think of and research examples of Christians demonstrating kindness.

Research two Christian charities and write a paragraph for each describing what they do and how this demonstrates the kindness ‘fruit’ of the Holy Sprit.

Research two famous Christians (from the past or living today) who have demonstrated kindness to others and write a paragraph for each explaining what they have done and why you chose them. 

Monday 16th May 2020

Good morning! I hope you and your families have had a lovely weekend together! 

Why not start your day listening to my reading our class story 'Can you see me?' on the ClassDojo page? I hope you're enjoying it so far! 

Don't forget to take a look at today's collective worship under the 'Christian Life' tab on our school website or via the school ClassDojo page. 

 

SPaG: Here are you spellings for this week. Spend 10-15 minutes each day learning them ready for the test on Friday. 

 

English: You are going to continue work within your home learning booklets this week. Remember you do not need to print these booklets, you can answer questions/complete work in your books. 

Year 5: Booklet. Today I would like you to start by re-reading the story 'The Game' and then complete the sentence starters on page 10. You need to think about what you liked, disliked, would like to know and what surprised you. Then complete the twelve comprehension questions on pages 11-13. Answer these in full sentences in your books. 

Year 6: Booklet. You are going to start by completing activity 5: 'The Door' where you need to read Miroslav Holub's poem and make some notes on it. Listen to the two contrasting performances of it and decide how you would perform this poem. Now complete activity 6 which is comprehension activity based on an extract from 'The Snow-walker's Son' by Catherine Fisher. Answer the questions in full sentences in your books. 

 

Maths: Spend around 15 minutes improving your position on the leaderboard on times tables rockstars, or alternatively play on Prodigy. 

Year 5: Last week you did some fantastic work on working out angles on a straight line (180 degrees). Today we are going to work out angles around a point. We need to remember that there are 360 degrees in a full turn. Sometimes we can calculate the size of angles from given facts. 

In this example below, we need to work out how many degrees angle X is. We can see there are two 90 degree right angles, a 30 degree angle and a 50 degree angle. If we add all these up we would get 260 degrees. So to work out X we just need to subtract this from 360 degrees which is 100 degrees. Alternatively we could have taken all the angles away separately instead of adding them together first: 360 - 90 - 90 - 30 - 50 = 100 degrees. 

Degrees and angles explained | Calculating angles in a triangle ...

Have a go at this. For some extra practise click here

 

Year 6: Last week you did some fantastic work on calculating missing angles. Today we are going to do some work on vertically opposite angles. Vertically opposite angles share a vertex and so are equal. Have a look at the example below.

seven mathematics problems on vertically opposite angles We can see that angles m and n are opposite angles and so they are equal. We can see that angles b and a are opposite angles and so they are equal. 

If angle b = 110 degrees then angle a = 110 degrees. Using this information can you work out how many degrees angles m and n are? (Hint: remember that angles around a point total 360 degrees). 

Have a go at this activity. Choose your level of challenge. 

Now have a go at this calculating angles challenge. Make sure all the angles add up to 360 degrees. 

 

Mental Health Awareness Week: This week is mental health awareness week and the theme is kindness. Click here to see the poster. Kindness is so important, now more than ever. Kindness encompasses so much and can take many forms, from kindness to each other, ourselves, to animals, the planet... 

Here are some quotes to get us thinking about kindness: 

  • "Be kind to the unking people. They need it the most." - Ashleigh Brilliant
  • Sometimes it takes only one act of kindness and caring to change a person’s life.” – Jackie Chan
  • "In a world where you can be anything, be kind" - Unknown 
  • Do things for people not because of who they are or what they do in return, but because of who you are.”Harold S. Kushner
  • Carry out a random act of kindness, with no expectation of reward, safe in the knowledge that one day someone might do the same for you.” – Princess Diana
  • “Because that’s what kindness is. It’s not doing something for someone else because they can’t, but because you can.” Andrew Iskander
  • Remember there’s no such thing as a small act of kindness. Every act creates a ripple with no logical end.”Scott Adams

Read each of these quotes about kindness carefully and order them in your books in order of your favourite to least favourite. 

Now design a decorative mural/plaque/poster with your favourite quote on, so you can display it somewhere in your room to remind you of it. Alternatively you might come up with your own saying about kindness. 

My favourite quote from the list is: "In a world where you can be anything, be kind" and here is a great example of how someone has turned it into artwork for a wall: In a World Where You Can Be Anything Be Kind Card | Zazzle.com ...

Now have a go at creating a kindness tree. Here is a paper template which you could use as an idea. You might want to have a go at drawing a tree by following a tutorial such as this one. You might want to collect some sticks/twigs and have a go at using these to create your own kindness tree. Decorate your kindness tree with little paper labels with ideas on how to be kind. You could label your tree with acts of kindness that you or other people already do or things that you could do in the future.

Winter Tree Art for Kids - Fantastic Fun & Learning

 

 

 

Friday 15th May 2020

Happy Friday everyone! It was lovely to see most of you on the class Zoom yesterday, ask your parents to keep on their emails for the next invitation! 

Have a go at this Friday dance! 

Take a look at today's collective worship under the 'Christian Life' tab on our school website or via the school ClassDojo page. 

Have one last look at your weekly spellings before asking an adult to test you on them. Remember to write them as part of a sentence! 

Every day I am going to read you a chapter or two of our new class book called 'Can you see me?' by Libby Scott and Rebecca Westcott. I uploaded the first video to the year group  ClassDojo page last night. This is a very powerful book which I hope you all listen to and enjoy. 

                                                                                                                     Can You See Me? by Libby Scott, Rebecca Westcott | Waterstones

English: 

Year 5: Re-read the story 'The Game' from your booklet. Make a list in your books of any words that are unfamiliar. Look up the words in a dictionary/online dictionary and try putting them into a sentence. Once you have done that, complete the sentence writing activity on pages 8 and half way down page 9. 

Year 6: Look at activity 3 on page 6 of your booklet. You need to get creative because you need to design draw/paint your own door idea. Now do activity 4 on page 7. This activity is about idioms. An idiom is a common word or phrase which means something different from its literal meaning, but we can understand what they mean because they are used a lot. An example might be "we're all in the same boat" which means the situation is the same for everyone. Another common example is "a piece of cake" to describe something as easy. Have a look at the table list of idioms in your booklet and try and work out what each means. 

 

Maths: For a warm-up choose either a 1-7 times table challenge or a 1-14(+20) times table challenge. Check your answers with a calculator or ask an adult. Remember to time yourselves and show me on ClassDojo! 

Look very carefully at this image. Count all the obtuse angles you can see and estimate their sizes in degrees. 

  

Sometimes we can work out the size of an angle without the use of a protractor. If we know that the angles in a straight line add up to 180 degrees, we can work out what angle x is if we subtract 100 degrees from 180 degrees which is 80 degrees. 

Angles on a straight line - YouTube  angle x = 80 degrees 

If we know that angles around a point add up to 360 degrees, we can work out what angle x is by subtracting 240 degrees from 360 degrees which is 120 degrees. 

Angles around a point - YouTube angle x = 120 degrees

Year 5: Have a go at calculating angles here

Year 6: Have a go at calculating angles here

 

Science: We are going to carry on with our learning about life cycles today and we are going to learn about metamorphosis.

Metamorphosis is a process by which animals undergo an abrupt and obvious change in the structure of their body and their behaviour. Some animals undergo complete metamorphosis, which they completely transform. Other animals experience incomplete metamorphosis, where they go through several different stages, with each stage bigger than the last. Watch the following clip carefully and make a note of the examples of metamorphosis it gives while you watch it. Draw and label the life cycle of a frog and a butterfly in your book. Explain why these are examples of metamorphosis.

                                                                     Grangetto's Farm and Garden Supply Services - » A Butterfly Garden                        Deadly virus killing British frogs and you could be accidentally ...

 

Thursday 14th May 2020

Good morning and happy Thursday! 

For your PE today I'd like you to create an obstacle course either in your house or garden. Use things around your house to built your obstacle course. Aim for at least 5 obstacles. One step could be something as simple as folding a sheet up as fast as you can. Put a picture or a video of your obstacle course on ClassDojo. Aim for the obstacle course to exercise your arms and legs. 

Spend 10-15 minutes continuing to learn your weekly spellings. Choose and complete a spelling activity in your books. I've seen some great bubble writing the past few days! 

Today is our Y5/6 class Zoom meeting at 4pm. Remember that your parents have to agree to the terms I sent in the email yesterday and parents need to at least be in the same room. 

Have a look at today's collective worship under the 'Christian Life' tab on our school website or via the school ClassDojo page. 

 

English: Until half term, year 5 and year 6 are going to be doing some different activities for English. We are going to be working from an exciting booklet which you will find below. You do not need to print this booklet, you can write your work in your books. It is important that you only complete the pages I set you each day, and not rush ahead!

Year 5: Your exciting booklet is called 'The Game' written by Maria Richards. Click here. Read the information on 'Jumanji' on page 3. The plot pattern is laid out in a table on page 4 and the story 'The Game' follows this simple plot pattern. Read the first part of 'The Game' then predict what will happen next. Read the rest of the story which finishes half way down page 7. Was your prediction similar or different? 

Year 6: Your exciting booklet is called 'Doors - the world of possibility' by Jamie Thomas. Click here. Read the introduction on page 2 then complete activity 1 which asks you to reflect on the things you are missing. You are going to use your imagination to create a poem in activity 2 by using the sentence starter 'I opened the magical door and saw...' Turn your ideas into a poem. Read the example given that was created by a year 6 class. Have a go at the challenge at the bottom of page 5 which asks you to consider senses. 

 

Maths: I was very impressed with the acute, right, obtuse and reflex angles some of you found around your homes yesterday! 

Today we are going to do some work on protractors, which are sometimes used to measure angles. Carefully read the information on this page and watch the short clips. Have a go at the activity near the bottom of the page where you can drag the protractor to measure the angles in the triangle. Use the arrow keys to position the protractor. 

Have a go at estimating angle sizes by playing this game. Click to start and then stop. The more accurate you are the more points you'll score. 

Year 5: Have a go at reading protractors here

Year 6: Have a go at reading protractors here. Now complete the following two activities on ClassroomSecretsKids

  • Year 6 Introduce angles game
  • Year 6 Measure with a protractor game 

 

PSHCE: As the lockdown continues, we are missing being at school for a variety of reasons. I'd like us to take some time to reflect on how wonderful our school is. You are going to produce a leaflet advertising our school. Your audience is somebody who doesn't know our school at all and we need to persuade our audience that Beckermet Primary School is a fantastic place. Your leaflet should include information about: 

  • Our name, logo and locational information (e.g. in a quiet area, close to...)
  • The structure of our school - classes, year groups, sizes. 
  • The what the people in our school are like (staff and pupils) but don't include any names. 
  • Our school building and grounds (e.g. large playground and garden with lots of trees)
  • The facilities and equipment we have (e.g. sports, laptops, iPads) 
  • What we do in our school
  • How people are treated in our school 
  • Anything else you think to include 

Include lots of drawings, description and have a read of this persuasive language. I can't wait to see your beautiful leaflets on ClassDojo. 

 

Music: We are going to do an activity today which is going to get you really thinking about a song and its lyrics. As we have finished our work on Oliver Twist in English we are going to look closely at a song from the 1968 musical 'Oliver!'

Click here to see a booklet on the song 'Food Glorious Food' from the musical. There are links to click which take you to a Youtube clip and also lyrics, so parental supervision is needed. Listen to the song carefully and read the lyrics. Answer the 'Retrieval and Recording' and 'Context Clues' pages in your books. You can check your answers at the end of the booklet. 

Wednesday 13th May 2020

Good morning! I hope you have all had a good sleep and are ready for the day! 

If you didn't use the fitness cards to create your own routine yesterday, have a go at this today. It's great that so many of you are still taking part in the Joe Wicks live PE lessons each day. 

Remember to have a look at today's collective worship under the 'Christian Life' tab on our school website or via the school ClassDojo page. 

Spend 10-15 minutes continuing to learn your weekly spellings. Choose and complete a spelling activity in your books. Someone in our class has did some very fast speed write challenges yesterday! 

This Thursday we are going to have a year 5/6 whole class Zoom meeting at 4pm. This is a chance for us all to see each other and have a catch up. If your parents did not get my email about it though parent mail please ask them to get in touch with me so I can give them the details about it. 

 

English: I was so impressed with your work yesterday. You've really thought carefully about the themes and messages Charles Dickens was giving. If you still haven't submitted your writing to me on ClassDojo please do so ASAP! 

As we have finished the story and our work on it, I'd like you to complete a detailed book review today. There are lots to think about when writing a book review. Click here for the template. Feel free to design your own book review in your book, as long as you include all the elements. Remember that we have not read the full and original version of Oliver Twist, we have read the condensed and retold version by Gill Tavner, illustrated by Karen Donnelly. 

Here are some front covers of publications and versions of Oliver Twist, including Gill Tavner's that we read. I'd like you to use a page in your book to design a different front cover. books, Charles Dickens: "The Adventures of Oliver Twist", (1838 ...  Oliver Twist (Great Illustrated Classics ): Charles Dickens ...  Oliver Twist : Charles Dickens : 9780141322438  Scholastic Classics: Oliver Twist - Scholastic Shop  Read 52 Books in 52 Weeks: BW4: Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens  Oliver Twist (Audio Download): Amazon.co.uk: Charles Dickens, Gill ... 

 

Maths: Well done on your reasoning and problem solving paper yesterday. If you did not get chance to finish it yesterday then please do so today. 

Today we are going to start some work on angles. Angles are all around us! An angle is measured in degrees (°) and is the space between two intersecting lines or surfaces. 

 Angle Facts - Revision Cards in GCSE MathematicsWe need to recognise a full turn as 360 degrees, a half-turn as 180 degrees and a quarter-turn (or right angle) as 90 degrees. 

Have a go at using this online angle maker to make a quarter turn/right angle (90 degrees) and a 180 degree half turn. Click on the protractor to check. 

Angles are given names depending on their size. 

  • An angle less than 90° is  acute  . 

 

  • An angle between 90° and 180° is  obtuse  . 

 

  • An angle greater than 180° is  reflex  . 

 

  • An angle of exactly 90° is a  right-angle

Watch this short clip and have a go at the questions underneath. Use the online angle maker to make an acute, right-angle, obtuse and reflex angle. Draw a poster in your book on the types of angles and sketch an example of each to help you remember. One way to remember how big an acute angle is to think of them as A CUTE little angle. 

Now go on an angle hunt in your house to find at least two examples of an acute, right angle, obtuse and reflex angle and add these to your poster. You might want to make a recording of the angles in your house and upload this to ClassDojo! 

Free Stock Photo 4077-open laptop | freeimageslive For example, this laptop is open at an obtuse angle. 

Year 5: Click here 

Year 6: Click here 

 

RE: Today we are going to consider what is meant by the 'fruit' of the Holy Sprit. 

The bible refers to the ‘fruit’ of the Holy spirit. What do you think is meant by the fruit of the Holy Spirit? Read and reflect on the following extract:

Galatians 5:22-23 New International Version - "But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control."

Fruit of the Holy Spirit refers to the goodness and attributes it brings. How do you demonstrate ‘fruit’ in your life? Are any of these 'fruit' the same as our whole-school Christian values? Below is an illustration of the 'fruit' of the Holy Spirit represented as a fruit tree.  Let's get arty! Use a fresh page in your book/piece of plain paper. Design and draw your own fruit tree and inside each fruit give an example of how you show that attribute.

An example you might write could be: I show self control because if I am angry I calm down by counting to ten so I don't say something in temper. 

Biblical Illustration From The New Testament Fruit Of The Spirit ...

Tuesday 12th May 2020

Good morning and happy Tuesday!

What are you going to do to stay active today? Why not develop your own fitness routine with these cards. 

Remember to look at today's collective worship under the 'Christian Life' tab on our school website or via the school ClassDojo page. 

Spend 10-15 minutes continuing to learn your weekly spellings. Choose and complete a spelling activity in your books. 

 

English: So far I've been very impressed with your writing. If you still haven't shown me your final version on ClassDojo please do so! Today I am going to read you the rest of the story. Click here and here. Now we have finished the story I would like us to think about the themes that Charles Dickens was exploring in Oliver Twist. What do you think Charles Dickens is saying about the following themes in the story of Oliver Twist? 

  • Childhood poverty 
  • poverty and crime
  • honesty and deceit 
  • love
  • the power of good to overcome evil 
  • loyalty 
  • the city and the countryside

Use each theme as a subheading in your book and write me a couple of sentences for each. Give reasons for your thinking. 

 

Maths: Let's start with a number bond challenge to warm-up! Here is a 10, 20 and 100 number bond challenge. If you're feeling brave have a go at this number bonds to 1000 challenge! 

Well done on your super effort yesterday with your arithmetic paper. Today you have a reasoning maths paper to do. Answer them in your books and if you get stuck on a question move onto the next one. 

Year 5: The time limit set on the assessment is 35 minutes, but allow yourselves an hour. Assessment and answers. 

Year 6: The time limit set on the assessment is 40 minutes, but allow yourselves an hour. Assessment and answers

 

Florence Nightingale: Today is a significant day because it is Florence Nightingale's bicentennial year, meaning it is 200 years since her birth. To commemorate this the World Health Organisation (WHO) have designated 2020 as the first ever global Year of the Nurse and Midwife. Read up on Florence Nightingale here and watch this clip and this song. Make me a list of 5 reasons why she deserves to still be remembered today. As the Covid-19 epidemic was spreading in England, the UK government and NHS England were planning temporary large-scale critical care hospitals to provide cover for the projected increase in patients likely to need this type of facility. These hospitals were named NHS Nightingale Hospitals, named after Florence Nightingale, who is regarded as the founder of modern nursing. 

The nursing profession has changed over time. Today nurses are thoroughly trained and usually specialise in a certain area. Read this . Nursing is a very rewarding and varied profession; what are the different types of nursing? Use this template to create a job advertisement for a nurse.

Male And Female Nurses Or Surgeons Illustration 57516077 - Megapixl

 

Unveiling of Banksy artwork at University Hospital SouthamptonAnonymous street artist Banksy has donated a new artwork painted during lockdown to hang in a hospital corridor at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust. Could you have a go at creating a piece of artwork that symbolises NHS staff as being superheroes? 

 

Another artist has created this: 

NHS Superhero | Teaching Resources

Monday 11th May 2020 

I hope you've all had a lovely VE bank holiday and weekend! Don't forget to send me some pictures on ClassDojo! 

Remember to check today's Collective Worship in the 'Christian Life' tab of our school website, or on the school ClassDojo page. 

Start your day with the brilliant Joe Wicks daily exercise or have a go at Zumba kids if you'd prefer! 

 

Today would have been the beginning of SATs week for you year 6s. Here is a little poem to read. Click here for your 'SATs' paper!

 

SPaG: Here are your spellings for this week. Spend 10-15 minutes each day completing a spelling activity to help you learn them. 

 

English: At the end of last week I asked you to plan the rest of Oliver Twist. Watch Thursday's video (below) and re-read the bullet points of things to remember/include in your writing. Today I would like you to turn your planning into writing. This is your chance to write creatively and at length. Stop and read each paragraph after you have written it to check your spelling, handwriting, punctuation and that it makes sense. Once you have finished your first draft, purple (or other colour) ink you work and ask an adult to do the same for you. Remember 'purple inking' involves adding, taking away, changing, reorganising and correcting your work. I'm looking forward to seeing your fantastic writing on ClassDojo! 

 

Maths: I'm so so impressed with the leaderboard on Times Table Rockstars! Spend 15 minutes on it today as a warm up and to help keep this up! 

Before we move onto our Geometry unit, I'd like you to complete an arithmetic paper. Write your answers in your book. If you get stuck on a question then move onto the next one.  Read the question carefully and check your work. 

Year 5: Arithmetic paper and answers

Year 6: Arithmetic paper and answers

 

Fairtrade Day: Saturday was the Fairtrade foundation day so we are going to do some activities based on it today. 

Earlier in the year we looked at the Fairtrade foundation as part of our RE work on justice. We learned that when farmers in poorer countries get a 'fair' price for the products they produce there are many benefits. Click here to remind yourselves of the economic, environmental and social benefits of Fairtrade. 

Choose one of the following activities to complete: 

  • Write a letter to Bill who is setting up a shop. He doesn't know much about Fairtrade. Write him a letter to explain what Fairtrade is and the benefits it has in order to persuade him to to stock Fairtrade products. Make him a list of Fairtrade products that he could stock in his shop. 

                                                                                               Street shop small store front Royalty Free Vector Image                             30 Clothes Clipart shopkeeper Free Clip Art stock illustrations ...                       25 Products to Celebrate 25 Years of Fairtrade

  • People may think of Fairtrade products/options as being mainly items such as bananas, coffee and chocolate. Fairtrade products are wide ranging. Click here to watch the Fairtrade cotton video and complete some of these activity ideas. 

                                                                                                       Why you should look for Fairtrade cotton | TreeHugger                    Fairtrade Net Cotton Soft bra, White | Swegmark of Sweden

 

  • The Fairtrade Mark mark is made up of a blue sky that symbolises optimism, and an arm, raised in the air – this symbolises empowerment. The Fairtrade mark also incorporates the colour green to symbolise growth. Re-design the Fairtrade mark. Think carefully about what the mark represents and should include. Make your new idea simple and easy to recognise. Make it bold and colourful so it stands out when it is on products. 

                                                                                                                     The Fairtrade Mark from the Fairtrade Foundation. | Fair trade ...               Person thinking clipart 5 - WikiClipArt

Thursday 7th May 2020

Good morning and happy Thursday! It is so lovely to see your hard work on ClassDojo! Keep it coming! 

As tomorrow is a bank holiday you may want to ask an adult to test you on your spellings today! Remember to write them as part of a sentence with joined up cursive handwriting. Have one last practise of them before the test. 

Don't forget to stay active every day! Luckily the weather has been beautiful this week so why not do some exercises in your garden. One member of our class made an excellent obstacle course earlier this week! My daily walk yesterday unexpectedly turned into a run as a very naughty dog called Meg managed to get off her lead! I think she thought we were playing a game of tig! 

Don't forget to have a look at today's Collective Worship in the 'Christian life' tab on our website or on the school ClassDojo page. 

 

English: Super impressed with your character descriptions yesterday. I'm not going to read any more of Oliver Twist to you today, but watch this video for a re-cap. Today we are going to plan the rest of the story ready to write on Monday. This is going to be very creative writing and it's completely up to you to decide how you want the story to 'peak' and what the ending will be. Look back at your 'sketch-up' and character pages or previous videos to refresh your memories of the story so far. Consider the following: 

  • I'd like some direct speech - refer back to your SPaG work and useful poster of rules from Monday. 
  • Aim to use some excellent vocabulary to describe setting and characters - refer to the higher level vocabulary banks from yesterday. 
  • I'd like you to create a new character and describe him/her in the same detail as you did yesterday. Like Charles Dickens I want you to consider the name of your created character carefully - is it an aptronym? 
  • Use paragraphs and aim to write at length. 
  • Aim to use all of the punctuation on the penultimate or last section of the punctuation pyramid. Punctuation Pyramids | English | KS1, KS2
  • Think carefully about the story so far and decide what the outcomes will be for the characters. What do you think is likely to happen and what would make sense? You are writing the peak/climax of the story and an ending. Don't leave your reader confused or wondering why something has happened. 

Today I'd like you to use the structure of this sheet to brainstorm potential ideas and use the flow chart to make notes and structure your paragraphs. We will write these on Monday.

 

Maths: Have a go at either this 7 times table challenge or this mixed (up to 13x!) challenge. Write your answers in your book if you can't print. Time yourselves. Ask an adult or use a calculator to check your answers.  

We've reached the end of our statistics block unit so today I'd like you to have a go at the end of block assessment. Remember to read each question carefully and check your answers at the end. Let me know how well you've done on ClassDojo. 

Year 5: End of block assessment and answers

Year 6: End of block assessment and answers. Y6 NOTE: do not complete the last question of the assessment as we have not covered this yet. 

 

VE Day activities: Let's get crafty! I'm sure many of you are having an isolation 75th VE anniversary party tomorrow! Whatever you do please take photos and please show me on ClassDojo! Here are some great ideas you and your families might like to try: 

  • Have a go at creating some bunting to decorate your homes or to make a lovely window display. Here is a template but you might want to design your own! Colouring sheets and paper chains are another great way to decorate! 
  • You might want to have a go at baking with an adult. Here are some ideas and here is a recipe from Phunky Foods which you might like! Other traditional 1940s baking ideas could be wartime pancakes, apple crumble, bread and butter pudding or Oaty biscuits to name a few. 
  • You might want to have a go at making an afternoon tea and having a picnic!
  • You might want to make a door decoration such as this wreath or make red, white and blue balloon cut outs to hang. 

                                  VE Day 75: Parties and Celebrations - VE Day 75 

Union Jack Facts for Kids Did you know the Union Jack is a combination of the English, Northern Ireland and Scottish flag? 

Wednesday 6th May 2020

Good morning and happy Wednesday! 

What are you doing to keep active today? This workout clip from Mr Motivator is fantastic! 

Spend some time practising your spellings today by completing a spelling activity. One member of our class created a rainbow yesterday out of her weekly spellings. What a great idea! 

Have a look at today's Collective Worship under the 'Christian Life' tab or on the school page on ClassDojo. 

English: I loved your thoughts about the character names Charles Dickens chose yesterday. Watch the next part of the story. 

Today you are going to choose two characters from Oliver Twist and write a detailed character description for each of them. When we are describing characters we need to think of both their physical appearance and their personalities. Here is an example. What is good/not so good about this character description? Could you draw the character from the description given? When you have decided on which two Oliver Twist characters you are going to describe use this planning sheet or write some ideas in your books first. Use this, this and this to help you think about your vocabulary. Think about the senses: what the character looks, smells and sounds like. Once you've finished planning, have a go at creating two detailed character descriptions. Once you have done this, compare the two characters by writing some comparative sentences. Feel free to add a character drawing to your writing. 

 

Maths: 

Year 5: For a warm-up and revision I'd like you to complete the 'Draw Line Graphs' game from ClassroomSecretsKids. 

We are going to do some problem solving questions based on line graphs and reading tables. Here are your questions and answers. Remember when problem solving it is important to take your time to carefully read and consider the question. 

Year 6: For a warm-up and revision I'd like you to complete the 'Add and subtract integers' and 'Division to solve problems' game on ClassroomSecretsKids. 

Today we are going to be working on mean averages. To work out the mean average of a set of data we need to remember mean = total ÷ number of items. Here is a useful rhyme: 

Hey Diddle Diddle Mean, Mode, and Median | Homeschool math, Math ...

If six children were playing a game and the scores were: 

Player  Score
Player 1 5
Player 2 6
Player 3 7
Player 4 2
Player 5 11
Player 6 9

  To work out the mean average score I first need to work out the total of the scores (5+6+7+2+11+9) which is 40. Then I need to divide this total by the number of players (6). 40 ÷ 6 = 6.66 recurring so 6.67 to two decimal places. 

 

 

 

Have a go at this activity and then this activity. 

 

VE Day activities: If you did not complete yesterday's activity please do so. Today we are going to think about what it must have felt like 75 years ago on VE day on the 8th May 1945.

VE Day celebrates Victory in Europe Day – the day that Nazi’s in Germany officially surrendered, marking the end of the Second World War.

VE Day takes place on 8th May, commemorating the same day back in 1945 when the war finally ceased. On that day, people from across the globe flocked to the streets for parties and get-togethers, enjoying their freedom for the first time in six years. Watch this clip from the BBC. 

Watch this video to see the scale of the celebrations outside Buckingham Palace. Winston Churchill was the British Prime Minister who led Britain through the Second World War. 

When is VE Day? Date and celebrations planned to mark end of WW2 ... The Royal family and Winston Churchill standing on a balcony at Buckingham Palace greeting the crowds of people celebrating. 

From left to right: Princess Elizabeth (our now Queen Elizabeth II), Queen consort (Queen mother), Winston Churchill (Prime Minister), King George VI, Princess Margaret.

At 3pm on VE Day, Winston Churchill addressed the nation in a radio broadcast. Read his speech here. Summarise the speech in your books and reflect on how you would have felt listening to that speech. 

King George VI also gave a radio speech. He famously said, “Let us remember those who will not come back…let us remember the men in all the services, and the women in all the services, who have laid down their lives. We have come to the end of our tribulation and they are not with us at the moment of our rejoicing.” Write down in your books what you think the King meant by this? How would you have felt listening? 

The then Princess Elizabeth (now Queen Elizabeth II), and her sister Princess Margaret slipped out and joined the crowds outside Buckingham Palace celebrating the end of the war on VE Day! Under the darkness, the Princesses were able to celebrate unnoticed. The Queen allegedly called it “one of the most memorable nights of my life”. Describe in your books what you think the princesses saw. 

Huge crowds gathered in Trafalgar Square and up the Mall towards Buckingham Palace. People elsewhere were also having street parties. Lots of music, dancing and food was had. Can you find out more about the food? 

In your books I'd like you to write down how you would've felt and how you would've celebrated that day and night. 

Have a go at these reading activities. Choose your level of challenge. 

Tomorrow we are going to do some crafty activities in preparation to celebrate VE day this Friday. 

 

Tuesday 5th May 2020

Good morning! Poor Joe Wicks is temporarily out of action due to his wrist, but his wife is doing a great job stepping in for him! What are you going to do today to stay fit and healthy? Some of you have been telling me about your lovely walks you've been on with your parents. Why not have a go at some Cosmic Kids Yoga

Remember to spend a short while practising your spellings each day. 

Have a look at today's Collective Worship under the 'Christian Life' tab or on the school page on ClassDojo. 

Today's English and Maths activities are a little shorter as I would like you to complete some Science and VE day work. 

English: I thought your diary entries you did on Friday were fantastic! Click here to watch me reading the next section of Oliver Twist. I hope you're loving the story as much as me. Add to your 'sketch-up' page and character page in your books. Today I'd like you to reflect on the characters in Oliver Twist so far. Charles Dickens was well known for creating very interesting characters. He would often give the characters names that reflect their attributes. This is referred to as an aptronym. An example would be a white cat called 'Snowy' or a pirate with a hook for a hand being called Captain Hook. For each of the characters in Oliver Twist I'd like you to write down in your book why you think/don't think their name suits them. Think carefully about what the character's names sound like.

For example you may write: I think Charles Dickens gave Oliver Twist his name because his life is full of twists. 

 

Maths:  15 minute warm-up time on Times tables Rockstars or Prodigy. 

Year 5: We are going to continue our work on reading timetables today. Remember there are 60 minutes in an hour. Click here to see a TV guide. Use the TV guide to answer these questions. If you managed to complete your TV timetable work in good time, I'd like you to refresh your knowledge of converting between different units of measure. Choose two of these challenge cards. 

Year 6: We are going to continue our work on percentage pie charts today. We are then going to have a go at constructing a pie chart from a percentage bar model. 

Have a look at the following pie chart: 

Pie Graph Example | Graphing, Pie chart examples, Pie graph 

500 people were asked which type of pet they own. If we wanted to know how many own a cat we need to work out 30% of 500 because we can see the red sector of the circle shows 30%. 

To do this we can find 10% and multiply this by 3 to get 30%. To calculate 10% we divide 500 by 10 = 50. Then we need to do 50 x 3 = 150.  

If I wanted to work out how many people own a fish I would need to work out 6% of 500. To do this I could work out 5% and 1% and add them together. I know that 10% of 500 = 50 so 5% would be half of this which is 25. To work out 1% I can divide 500 by 100 = 5. Adding these together would get me 30. 

Can you work out how many people own a dog? 

How many people own a rodent? 

Have a go at this activity. Choose your level of challenge.

Now have a go at this activity. You need to use the percentage bar to help you draw the sectors of the pie chart. If you can't print then draw a circle in your book, doing your best to estimate the sectors of the circle based on the percentages. Remember to label your sectors and include a key. 

 

Science: We've been looking at life cycles and sometimes life cycles can be disturbed or come under threat. When this happens a species can become endangered or even extinct. 

Today we are going to learn about a British scientist called Jane Goodall. She studied Chimpanzees for many years and is considered to be the world expert on them and their behaviour. Read about her here and explore the Jane Goodall institute here. Jane went to Tanzania to study Chimpanzees – can you locate Tanzania on a world map/google earth?

Chimpanzees are under threat and are an endangered species because their life cycle has been unable to continue in its normal way. Some of the threats to their life cycle include:

  • Poachers hunt and kill chimpanzees, which are sold to people living in cities.
  • Baby chimpanzees are taken illegally to be exotic pets.
  • Chimpanzees lose their habitats when forests are cut down for timber or to clear space for farming.
  • Wars and conflict in the areas in which the chimpanzees live also cause habitat loss and can result in the deaths of chimpanzees.
  • Diseases can affect chimpanzees, and can drastically reduce their population.

Create an information leaflet telling people about Jane Goodall’s work and what her institute does. Include information on why chimpanzees are in danger of becoming extinct and encourage people to donate. Key words to include: British, scientist, world, expert, Gombe, Tanzania, Africa, names, personalities, family, chimpanzees, species, extinct, endangered, forests, meat, pets, life cycle.

 

VE day activity: This Friday is a bank holiday because it is the 75th anniversary of VE (Victory in Europe) day. This marks the day that the second World War ended in Europe. We are going to do some activities each day on the lead up to Friday. Today we are going to learn: what VE day is, when in history it happened, the causes/significant events of World War 2, what happened on VE day and why we should remember it. Watch this informative video on VE day. You'll need this accompanying document but you can complete the activities in your books. 

                         VE Day 75 | Remembrance Events | Royal British Legion                                                                                             Victory in Europe Day - Wikipedia

Monday 4th May 2020

Good morning everyone! Hope you and you families had a lovely weekend!

Remember to try and do something to keep active each day, no matter how much you do it makes a huge difference!

Have a look at today’s collective worship from Mrs Birkett under the ‘Christian Life’ tab.

 

SPaG: Here are you spellings for this week. Spend a short while practising them each day, completing your weekly spelling activities in your books.

 

Later this week we are going to be doing some story writing so today’s SPaG would be best spent refreshing our memories of inverted commas. Inverted commas are punctuation we use when writing direct speech in our work. For example:

“Hurry up Nancy!” said Fagin.

Notice how what Fagin says has inverted commas around it. Also remember that any punctuation needs to be come before the closing inverted comma. Either ! ? or ,

I’ve used the reporting verb said. Said is the most common reporting verb but it is best we alternate these. For example:

“Hurry up Nancy!” bellowed Fagin.

The reporting verb bellowed gives us more information about how Fagin is speaking.

I could have perhaps used snarled, snapped or demanded.

Have a watch of this song about inverted commas. Remember the rule that we start a new line for a new speaker in our writing. For example:

“Hurry up Nancy!” bellowed Fagin.

“Alright I’m coming,” sighed Nancy.

This useful poster summarises the rules when writing direct speech.

Choose one of the following to complete:

  • Come up with 5 sentences of your own that include some speech. You could come up with some sentences to do with the story Oliver Twist like my example above. Use the useful poster to check you’ve used inverted commas accurately.
  • Have a go at activity A or if you’re feeling confident try activity B.

 

Maths: Keep up the good work on times table rockstars! Remember you need to answer the questions in 3 seconds or under before you can move onto the next times table.

Year 5: For revision login and complete the ‘square numbers game’ and the ‘divide with remainders reasoning practice’ game on ClassroomSecretsKids.

Today we are going to look at timetables. Timetables often include 24 hour clock times so have a go at an activity from this page to refresh your time knowledge. 

This timetable shows the school day for a reception class.

 How long does the assembly last?

Which is the shortest lesson of the day? Lesson 1, 2 or 3?

How long do the after school clubs last for?

How long do the children have for lunch?

 Have a go at this activity. Choose you level of challenge.

 

Year 6: For revision login and play the ‘percentage of amounts’ game and the ‘Arithmetic test practice 1’ on ClassroomSecretsKids. 

Today we are going to continue our work on pie charts.

We are going to look at pie charts with percentages. It is important to know that the whole of a pie chart totals 100%. We sometimes need to apply our understanding of calculating percentages of amounts to interpret pie charts.

200 people were asked about their favourite genre of film. Here is a pie chart showing the results. 

We can see that 30% like Romance films. To work out how many people this is I need to work out 30% of 200.

10% of 200 = 20 so 30% will be 3 x 20 = 60 people.

Here is a link if you would like to refresh you knowledge of calculating percentages of whole numbers. 

 Have a go at this activity. If you’re feeling confident then choose a page from here also. 

 

RE: Today we are going to think about Pentecost. The day of Pentecost refers to the day that the Holy Sprit descended onto Jesus’ followers as he promised. Christians celebrate Pentecost each year seven weeks after Easter Sunday. This year Pentecost is on Sunday 31st May. Watch this animation and answer the following questions in your book:

  • What did the Holy spirit sound like?
  • What appeared above the heads of Jesus’ followers?
  • Who was nearby when this happened?
  • What power/ability/skill/gift did the Holy Sprit give Jesus’ followers? What did this enable them to do?
  • Can you summarise what Peter said and did?
  • What would Jesus’ followers have felt like when they received the Holy Spirit?

 

The Holy Spirit gave Jesus’ followers the ability to speak different languages. Why was this useful? They were also able to forgive sins and perform miracles to the sick. If you could choose, what power/ability/skill/gift would you choose to have? Write this in your books and tell me why.

 

Spend a few minutes looking at Giotto’s Pentecost painting. Can you spot the dove? Write down 3 observations you can make about the painting. 

Friday 1st May 2020

Happy Friday! I hope you're all ready for an adult to test you on your weekly spellings. Remember to write your spellings as part of a sentence and don't forget that beautiful cursive handwriting! 

Have a look at the 'What's going on' sub-tab of our class page to see some pictures of what our class has been up to. 

Take a look at today's collective worship in the 'Christian life' tab on our website. 

What are you going to do to keep active today? If the weather isn't so good why not have a go at following Joe Wicks or Zumba kids? 

 

English: Thank you to those who put your English work on ClassDojo yesterday. It was nice to see so many of you have really thought about your responses to those questions to do with Fagin. 

Watch this clip of me reading the next part of the story. Update your character and 'sketch-up' page in your books.

Today I would like you to write a diary entry from the perspective of Oliver. Imagine how he will be feeling at this part of the story. He has had the chance of a better life ripped away from him. Points/notes that you may wish to include/think about: 

  • Woke up and put on fine clothes. Describe what Oliver's room in Mr Brownlow's house might be like. How is Oliver feeling? Describe breakfast. 
  • Given the job of returning the books to the library and money to pay a bill. Imagine how Oliver would feel being trusted. 
  • Walking to the library. Describe the confusion at what Nancy is saying. Describe Nancy. Describe Oliver's fear when he was grabbed by Bill Sikes. Describe Bill Sikes. 
  • Describe the dread that Oliver would have felt when he knew he was being taken back to Fagin. Describe the familiar stench. 
  • Imagine how frantic Oliver must feel inside to imagine that Mr Brownlow might think him a thief for taking the money and books. What would Oliver write in a diary to convey this? 

You might want to use each of these bullet points as a basis for a paragraph in your diary entry. Try to include some expanded noun phrases to help make your diary entry more descriptive. Use this checklist when writing your diary entry. Remember to read back through and purple ink (or other colour) your work! I look forward to reading them on ClassDojo.

 

Maths: To warm up have a go at either a multiple of ten, mixed multiples or division challenge. Don't forget to time yourself. Ask an adult or use a calculator to help you check your score.  

Year 5: Today we are going to look at two-way tables. Two-way tables show two different sets of data, horizontally and vertically. Have a look at this two-way table which shows the most popular flavour (American spelling on table) of ice cream chosen by age group. 

Quiz & Worksheet - Two-Way Tables | Study.com

Which is the most popular flavour of ice cream in children? 

Which flavour is the least popular among adults? 

Which flavour is the most popular overall? 

Have a go at this activity. 

Year 6: Today we are going to read and interpret pie charts. A pie chart is a useful way to visually represent data as parts of a circle. We need to look at pie charts and work out what the 'whole' circle is worth. Then we need to work out fractions of amounts. In this example below, the whole pie chart represents how many people are left-handed and right-handed in a class of 24 children.

Simple Pie Charts For Kids | Charts for kids 

We can see from this pie chart that a quarter of the class are left-handed. As there are 24 children in the class then 6 must be left-handed as 6 is a quarter of 24. This would mean there are 18 right-handed children in the class. 

Have a go at this activity. 

 

Rest of day: Today is 'The Book Trust' Pyjamarama day! Theres a line up of brill activities!  I'd now like you to spend some time engaging with the activities that Mrs Birkett put onto our school's feed on ClassDojo. You can view here. Have lots of fun in your PJs and send me lots of pictures of what you get up to on ClassDojo!

Primary Booklet Click Here

Pyjamarama: enjoy a festival of stories on 1 May as part of ...

 

Thursday 30th April 2020

Morning everyone! Super work on ClassDojo yesterday keep it up! Remember to practise your spellings again today ready for your test on Friday! 

What are you going to do to keep active today? I'm going to take Meg for a walk at lunchtime and then this evening I'm going to have a go at following a yoga video. 

What are you reading at the moment? Please send me a picture of your book and tell me a little about it on ClassDojo. 

Have a look at today's collective worship from Mrs Birkett in the 'Christian life' tab. 

 

English: Well done on your work on workhouses yesterday! Watch this video where I read the next part of the story. Update your character page and your 'sketch-up' page. Think carefully about the character Fagin. In 1968 the story of Oliver Twist was adapted into a musical. Watch this clip. What are your thoughts on Fagin? He gives the boys shelter and food but in return they have to go out and steal for him. There is debate about Fagin. Some people would argue he is a better alternative to living in a workhouse and fair to the boys but others would view him as someone who is inciting vulnerable children into crime. Think about the following and write your responses in your book: 

  • Would you rather join Fagin or admit yourself to a workhouse? Why? 
  • What would you do in Oliver's situation? Do you think Oliver has a choice? 
  • Do you think Oliver realises what he is getting into? 
  • Is Fagin a hero or a villain? Or both? Write your answer as a paragraph with several considerations. 
  • Using description from the book and your own imagination, sketch Fagin in his home and surround your picture with powerful adjectives. 

I'm looking forward to seeing your responses on ClassDojo. 

 

Maths: To warm up have a go at the daily ten mental maths activities here. Choose your level, subject and time allowance. Spend some time playing 'Guardians: Defenders of Mathematica' here

Year 5: Today we are going to read and interpret tables. Have a look at the table below which shows the methods of travelling that children in a class use to get to school: 

11 Plus: Key Stage 2 Maths: Handling Data, Pie Charts, Pie Graphs ...

How many children are in the class altogether? 

Which is the most common mode of transport? 

How many more children walk than cycle? 

Have a go at this table. Choose A,B or C questions to answer. Here are the answers

Year 6: Today we are going to have a think about circles before we move onto pie charts. We are going to be thinking about vocabulary: centre, radius, diameter, circumference. Draw a circle in your book and as you watch this video, see if you can label the centre, radius, diameter and circumference on your circle. Write a definition of each. 

Now I'd like you to find 5 flat circular objects in your house such as a plate. Use your ruler to complete these sentences for each: The radius is ____. The diameter is _____. I know this because _____.

 

Science: How are your plants getting on from the cuttings last week? Let me see them on ClassDojo. Today we are going to think about mammals. 

A mammal is a particular type of animal. There are two things that make mammals special: Mammals make milk to feed their babies and they are warm blooded. This means they can maintain a constant body temperature, independent of the temperature of their environment. A baby will grow inside the female mammal for the length of the pregnancy, which is called the gestation period. At the end of the pregnancy the baby is born. The African elephant has the longest gestation period of any land mammal. Can you find out how long the pregnancy is? Write this in your book.

There are three different groups of mammals:

Placentals: their young grow inside the female’s body and are born fully developed.

Monotremes: their young hatch from eggs. When the babies are hatched the mother then feeds them milk so they are classed as mammals. These types of mammals are rare.

Marsupials: their young are born incompletely developed. They are then carried and fed in a pouch on the female’s stomach until they are fully developed.

Draw a table in your book with a column for each group of mammals and sort the following into the correct column: platypus, echidna, dog, rabbit, kangaroo, koala, whale, bat. Feel free to sketch them and include information about each mammal. Alternatively you may prefer to create a 'Mammals' poster with a section for placentals, monotremes and marsupials along with a definition and examples. 

Wednesday 29th April 2020

Good morning and happy Wednesday! Lovely to hear how you are all keeping active! Keep it up.

Have a look at today's collective worship - under heading Christian life - Collective Worship. Please send Mrs Birkett your pictures on her email.

 

English: Well done on your work yesterday finding out all about Charles Dickens. Watch this video clip of me introducing and reading the first part of Oliver Twist. Watch the video a couple of times and then pause it to have a read of the book yourselves. I'd like you to create a character page that you can add characters to as we read through the story. Start this today and leave space for more characters. Sketch, label and describe the characters we have came across in the story so far. I'd also like you to 'sketch-up' the story as we go along so start a page for this today. Create little symbols/sketches/key words that will help you learn the story. Add to these pages as we progress through the story. Here is an activity to get us thinking about workhouses. 

 

Maths: Today we are going to use line graphs to answer questions and solve problems. Have a look at this line graph which presents three sets of data on the sales of music: 

A summary of a line graph | Writing - Upper intermediate B2 ...

Using the graph answer these questions: 

  • In what year did downloading music overtake the purchasing of CDs? 
  • Why has the percentage of downloads and CDs purchased decreased in recent years? 
  • What does the graph suggest the trend will be in the coming years? 

 

Year 5: Have a go at these activities. Choose one page to do. 

Year 6: Have a go at these activities. Choose one page to do. 

 

PSHCE:  Today we are going to think about those that make a difference. I'm sure you've heard about Captain Tom Moore's fantastic fundraising.

 

Birthday cards Thousands of birthday cards have arrived for Captain Tom Moore          Captain Tom Moore Just Completed His 100th Lap Of His Garden After ... Captain Tom Moore

99-year-old British war veteran, Captain Tom Moore has completed 100 laps of his 25m back garden in Marston Moretaine, Bedfordshire! He has raised over £28 million for Britain's National Health Service (NHS) and has received donations to his fundraising challenge from all around the world! Captain Tom began raising funds to thank NHS staff who helped him with treatment for cancer and a broken hip, he originally aimed to raise just £1000 but quickly passed his target!
How can one person make a big difference?

Read through this information
 about Captain Tom Moore’s incredible achievement. Sometimes it’s not the biggest actions that can have the biggest impact and that all of the things that we do affect the world around us! Captain Tom didn’t even leave his garden but managed to raise a lot of money and raise the spirits of the nation! Can we think of anything we can do at the moment to help others? Captain Tom Moore has received a Pride of Britain Award and since received over 122,000 cards for his 100th birthday. 

Mother Teresa, a Catholic nun who dedicated her life to helping others said, “If you cannot feed a hundred people, feed one.” Think about what you think she meant by this? Do you agree?

However small we think our actions are, we can all contribute to help make a positive difference to the world around us. At some point, to someone or something, our actions matter! Think of a time when you made a difference to somebody. Think of a small thing you can do now or in the future that will make a difference to somebody. 

Write a letter or thank you card for someone who makes a difference to you or other people. This could be a friend, family member, neighbour, school staff, NHS worker etc. 

Tuesday 28th April 2020

Good morning! Hope you are all getting plenty of sleep and rest. What are you going to do to keep active today? Oti Mabuse uploads some daily dance tutorials if you fancy getting your dancing shoes on! 

Have a look at today's collective worship - under heading Christian life - Collective Worship. 

Another well done to those who are sharing work with me on ClassDojo, keep it up! If you haven't you must! 

Remember to complete a spelling activity each day to help you learn your spellings ready for Friday. 

 

English: I'm very excited that we are going to start work on some classical fiction this week. We are going to work on a story written by Charles Dickens who is a very significant author. What do you already know about him? Can you name anything he wrote? Do you already know some of the interesting characters he created? Make a list in your books if you do. Before we move onto the story I would like you first find out some information about him. This , this,  this website have some great information to get you started. Horrible histories have also written a song about him here. What does 'Dickensian' mean? I'd like you to write me a biography about him including these features. Please remember your punctuation in your writing and include some expanded noun phrases! 

I will introduce and read the first part of the story in a video to you all tomorrow. For now though there are two clues in the pictures below. Can you work out which Charles Dickens story it is going to be? 

Punctuation Pyramids | English | KS1, KS2                   Charles Dickens | Biography, Facts, & Analysis | Britannica                     Oliver Twist holding a bowl and asking for more — University of ...                           englishmajorana: A creative activity Oliver Twist's diary

Maths: Today we are going to have a go at drawing a line graph. If you don't have any squared paper or can't print some don't worry! Below is a picture of an interesting table of weather averages for England. 

Year 5: I would like you to look at the average monthly rainfall for England on the table and create a line graph to represent the data. Think carefully about a title, what will go on your x (horizontal) and y (vertical) axis. What will your increments be? Be very careful to use a ruler and make sure you have equal spacing between your increments on your axis. Remember to label your line graph. Once you have plotted each months average rainfall, carefully join them with a line (bit like a dot to dot!). Come up with three questions about your line graph for your parents to answer. 

Year 6: I would like you to do the year 5 activity first as practise (read above). Now I would like you to look at the average maximum temperature and average minimum temperature per month in England (in degrees celsius). I would like you to draw a line graph that presents both sets of data for comparison. Your end result should be a line graph that has two lines. To avoid confusion use a different colour pen/pencil for each line and show which is which in a key. For an idea of what your line graph should look like look here. Your finished line graph will help us to see how temperatures can vary in a month. Come up with 3 questions to ask your parents to answer. For example, which month has the biggest difference in temperature. 

Challenge: Do you have any computer software that you could create a line graph with? 

RE: Last week you looked at symbols commonly used to represent the Holy Trinity (the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit) and came up with your own.

Today we are going to think about the disciples and their feelings. Before Jesus ascended up to heaven, he asked his disciples to spread his teachings. Use this template or draw two or three disciples (of your choice) and write their names underneath them. Add a thought bubble above each one and write how they might have been feeling about what Jesus has asked them to do and why. Would they feel scared? Daunted? Worried? Anxious? Confident? Excited? Under pressure?

Jesus promised the disciples that they would soon receive the Holy Sprit which would help them in this work. Add another thought bubble and write in it what you think the disciple would be feeling about knowing they will receive the Holy Sprit and why. What would the disciple think it will be like? What questions might the disciple have about the Holy Spirit? 

 

 

Monday 27th April 2020 

Good morning and happy Monday! Hope you and your families have had a great weekend together! 

 

Collective Worship Today - Under heading Christian Life- Collective Worship

SPaG: Here are you spellings for this week. Start practising them today by choosing one of the spelling practise activities to do with them. Try to do a different activity each day for variety. 

Today I would like us to refresh our memories of noun phrases and expanded noun phrases. Let's start by remembering that a noun is a person, place or thing e.g. cup. Watch Mr Thorne explain what a noun phrase is here. Put the title 'Noun Phrases' in your book and come up with five of your own. Now let's think about expanded noun phrases. They tell us more about the noun. Click here to see some examples and a have a go at the quiz. Here is a useful video. In it, Mr Riley chooses a noun (monkey) and works up to an expanded noun phrase. Write the title 'Expanded Noun Phrases' in your books, choose at least 5 nouns in your house and write an expanded noun phrase for each of them. Remember your punctuation for expanded noun phrases such as: I was very interested by the cute, small and fluffy tiger cub at the zoo. 

 

Maths: Today we are going to start our statistics block of work. We are going to start by reading and interpreting line graphs. Line graphs are useful ways to show changes in information over time. 

Line graphs explained for primary-school parents | Reading a line ... 

This line graph shows changes in temperature in a day from 9am until 9pm. As a warm up answer the following questions in your book: 

  • What time was the warmest (peak in temperature) part of the day? What was the temperature? 
  • What time was the coolest part of the day? What was the temperature? 
  • The temperature was measured at 5 times during the day. How long were the intervals? 
  • What is the difference (change/variation) between the temperature at 9am and 3pm? 
  • Between which interval did the temperature drop the most? 

Sometimes more than one set of data can be represented on a graph, such as this in this line graph which shows how many muffins, scones and cookies were sold in a week in a bakery: 

How to Make Line Graphs in Excel | Smartsheet

There is a key to help us identify which line represents which set of data. On which day was there the same number of scones and muffins sold? 

Year 5: Have a go at this activity. Choose your level of challenge and write your answers in your books. Remember your units. 

Year 6: Have a go at this activity. Choose your level of challenge and write your answers in your books. Remember your units. 

 

Benin topic: I was very impressed with your British and world history timelines last week. Benin is located in Africa and today we are going to think about Africa's past. Africa is a huge continent with a large variety of physical features, climates and countries. Africa has an extremely interesting history, part of which we shall learn about in our Benin topic. The ancient Kingdom of Benin was in what is now Nigeria. Modern Benin is a country next to Nigeria. Click here to see an interactive history time map showing changes over time in  Africa. Click the left and right arrows to change the time period. What changes do you notice? Why do you think Africa has changed?

Have a go at this mapping activity in your books comparing how the Kingdom of Benin has changed (geographically). 

Here are some events in African history. Place them in chronological order in your books. Then list them in order that you think is of most importance. If you cannot print, then please just write the bold print title of each card after reading the information carefully. Here is a completed timeline

 

Friday 24th April 2020

Good morning and happy Friday! What are you going to do to keep active today? Why not celebrate a week of hard work with a Zumba kids dance! What are you going to be doing to keep active this weekend? Can't wait to see what you've been up to on ClassDojo.

Today's the day to see if you can recite 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth. Don't forget to put a picture or video of yourself on ClassDojo for me to see! If you haven't already put pictures of your Wordsworth house DT project on ClassDojo please do as soon as you can! 

 

Spellings: Complete one last spelling practise activity and ask an adult to test you on them. Ask an adult to read you each spelling word as part of a sentence for you to write down. 

 

English: Yesterday you wrote a 'nonsense' poem in the style of Spike Milliagans 'The Land of the Bumbly Boo' and I loved reading and listening to them. Well done!

Today we are going to think again about 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth. This is a poem about someone getting enjoyment and feeling better because of nature. I'd like you to pick an aspect of nature and write me a poem. You could pick anything from the woods to the sun to the sea. You could even choose an animal or even stick with a flower like William Wordsworth. Poetry doesn't have to follow rules or conventions but I'd like you to include some of the poetic devices we've looked at: 

  • similes (uses 'as' and 'like') 
  • metaphors 
  • personification 
  • Onomatopoeia. Onomatopoeia is a word that sounds like what it means. For example, the word 'bang' sounds like an actual bang. Onomatopoeia can be used to enhance a poem. Have a watch here and here are a few examples.
  • Descriptive words to put an image in your readers mind 
  • Stanzas 

Once you have written your final draft of your poem, highlight/underline any of the above features you have used. I can't wait to see them! 

 

Maths: Remember to keep practising your times tables on times table rockstars. Our class is currently set on 'automatic training' which means that you need to get 20 correct in a minute (or less that 3 seconds each) before the site will move you onto the next times table. It might be fun to challenge someone in the class to a battle! Keep up the good work! 

We've reached the end of our unit block on perimeter, area and volume. Look back in your books and our class page to refresh your mind of what we have been learning in maths for the past two weeks and then have a go at the end of block assessment(s) below. 

Year 5: Assessment 1 and Assessment 1 answers. Assessment 2 and assessment 2 answers

Year 6: Assessment 1 and assessment 1 answers

 

Science: Plants have a life cycle. Watch the following clip and read the accompanying information on the page. Can you sketch and annotate a plant's life cycle in your books as is in the clip? Some plants can reproduce by creating an identical copy of themselves, which is called asexual reproduction. This can be done in different ways. Some plants produce bulbs (e.g. daffodils) and others create tubers which sit under the soil and develop into new plants (e.g. potatoes). Sometimes humans make genetic copies of a plant by taking a cutting. This involves carefully cutting a piece of stem from the parent plant and encouraging the growth of roots, making a new plant. Could you have a go at making a copy of a plant by taking cuttings? You must as an adult before you do this and to help you! Here are some instructions. Monitor and make notes of your progress in your books. 

 

Thursday 23rd April 2020

Good morning! Lovely to see your work on ClassDojo, keep showing me! It's been especially nice to see what book you're reading at home. Send me a picture and tell me something about it if you haven't already. 

Keep yourselves active and make sure you get plenty of fresh air in this beautiful weather we're having! 

Make sure you're practising for your spelling test tomorrow using the spelling activity sheet you have. Complete these activities in your book. 

 

English: We've looked at two contrasting poems by two different poets in English. Yesterday we looked at 'The Land of the Bumbly Boo' by Spike Milligan. This is a fantastic nonsense poem and today I would like you to have a go at writing a nonsense poem of your own. Poetry doesn't have to follow rules or conventions but I'd like you to include some of the poetic devices we've looked at: 

  • similes (uses 'as' and 'like') 
  • metaphors 
  • personification 
  • Onomatopoeia. Onomatopoeia is a word that sounds like what it means. For example, the word 'bang' sounds like an actual bang. Onomatopoeia can be used to enhance a poem. Have a watch here and here are a few examples.
  • nonsense words/modified words

You need to think about what you would like your nonsense poem to be about - even though it won't fully make sense! Are you going to structure your poem into stanzas? Are you going to use a rhyme scheme? What images are you going to create in the readers mind? This is your chance to write very creatively indeed! Once you have written your final draft of your poem, highlight/underline any of the above features you have used. I can't wait to see them! 

Spend some more time learning 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth so you can recite the poem off by heart! 

 

Maths: Here is another times table and inverse challenge. See how many you can do in 10 minutes. Answers

Year 5: We are going to estimate volume and capacity today. Choose one page to complete from this and this, writing your answers in your books (remember title and date). There are answers at the end of each booklet to double check when you've finished. 

Year 6: Yesterday we were focusing on calculating the volume of a shape by counting its cubes. Today we are going to move onto calculating the volume of a shape by using the formula length x width x height (l x w x h) or alternatively we can work out the area of the base of the shape and multiplying this by the height. 

When shapes are irregular we sometimes need to split the shape and work out the volume in parts before adding these together to get the total volume e.g. Unit 22 Section 3 : Volume of a Cuboid (6cm x 2cm x 7cm) + (6cm x 6cm x 4cm) = __cm

Have a go at these

 

St George's day: Today,  23rd April 2020, is St George's day. To mark this I would like us to learn about St George. Watch this video and use the accompanying resources. Do not subscribe to the channel like it suggests you do in the video. You may like to create a storyboard of the story of St George in your books. 

 

Wednesday 22nd April 2020

Good morning! It seems like it's going to be another beautiful day again today. It's lovely to hear how some of you are making the most of your gardens and even doing a spot of gardening! 

Start your day off with some physical activity. Joe Wicks, Zumba Kids and Kids Yoga are all great ways to stay active. 

What book are you reading at the moment? I'd love you to post a picture of the book you're reading at home on ClassDojo and tell me something about it. 

Keep practising your spellings ready for an adult to test you on them on Friday. There's some tricky words this week! 

 

English: How are you getting on with reciting 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth? Keep practising this and please do post a picture or video of yourself reciting this on ClassDojo before the end of the week. 

Continuing with our poetry work, we are going to look at a contrasting poem by the poet Spike Milligan. Find out a little about his life and explore some of his well-known poems here. Spike Milligan wrote some 'nonsense' poetry which is a type of poetry that doesn't always make sense. Watch here and here. We are going to focus on his poem called 'The Land of the Bumbly Boo' which you can listen to and read here. Listen to the poem carefully. What is it about? What images does the poem put in your mind? Either print it out or copy it into your book. Identify and label the rhyme scheme and then I'd like you to highlight any words that are nonsense or modified words. Does Spike Milligan use metaphors, similes or personification in his poem? Highlight any examples of these you find. On a fresh page in your book draw 'The Land of the Bumbly Boo' as it is described in the poem. I'm looking forward to seeing what your 'pelican glue' will look like! 

 

Maths: Have a warm up with some times tables rockstars. The leaderboard is looking amazing keep it up! 

Year 5: We are going to continue our work on volume and capacity today. Remember capacity refers to the amount an object can hold. Have a go at this activity. 

Year 6: We are going to be thinking about volume today. Volume is the amount of space occupied up by a 3D object. Click here for a useful page. When an object is made up of cubes we can count them to work out its volume.Volume explained for primary-school parents | Volume and capacity ... Work out the volume of these shapes by counting the cubes. 

Have a go at this activity. Don't do all of them! Write your answers as cm³ in your books. 

 

PSHCE: You are going to get your thinking caps on today about ways we can help someone have a more healthy mind. Help Sarah here

 

Tuesday 21st April 2020

Good morning and happy Tuesday! Why not start your day watching Newsround. Remember your daily exercise; we've certainly got the weather for it at the moment! 

Remember to spend some time practising your spellings each day using your spellings activity sheet. Well done to those of you doing a great job polishing your times table knowledge on times table rockstars. I've loved seeing some of your Wordsworth House DT projects on ClassDojo, keep them coming! 

 

English: There's a great game called 'Crystal Explorers' on BBC bitesize. Play this for a short while to warm your brains up. Yesterday we were thinking about personification and looking to see if we can identify where William Wordsworth uses it in his 'Daffodils' poem. I'd like you to re-read the poem today and learn it off by heart! We need to be able to recite poetry and I'd like you to be able to do this by the end of this week. Learnt right you could potentially remember this poem for years to come. Start off by 'sketching up' the poem by drawing a series of small sketches for each stanza to help prompt you. Come up with some actions to help you remember and enhance your performance of the poem. Learn one stanza at a time. Watch this video to help you think about how you will perform the poem. Upload a picture or video by the end of the week on ClassDojo. 

 

Maths: As a warm up have a go at this multiplication and inverse division speed challenge or if you'd prefer spend some time upping your score on times table rockstars. You can either time yourself how long it takes to answer them or set a time limit. Ask a parent to check them for you or check them yourself with a calculator. 

Year 5: Today we are going to be thinking about volume. Volume is the amount of space a 3D shape takes up. If a 3D shape is made up of cubes we can work out its volume by counting the cubes. When we can't do this we need to use the formula height x width x length of the shape. We have to put ³ after our units of measurement to show volume as it is cubed e.g. The volume of my box is 48cm³. Have an explore of this activity before having a go at this activity. Then have a go at these activities. Remember that capacity is related to how much a container can hold whereas volume is the amount of solid space that something takes up. 

Year 6: Today we are going to calculate the area of a parallelogram. Can you remember what a parallelogram looks like? The formula for working out the area of a parallelogram is base x height and here is a short video to prove it. Can you get some paper/card and have a go at the step-by-step instructions below the video? Have a go at this activity before this activity (choose your level of challenge). 

RE: Today we are going to explore symbols that represent the Holy Trinity (the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit). In the bible there are different symbols which represent the Holy Spirit such as a dove, wind and fire. There are several different symbols used to represent the The Father (God) and The Son (Jesus) also. Here is one such representation:Identify the trinity sign - VisiHow

Why do you think there are hands representing The Father (God)? Why is there a crown of thorns representing The Son (Jesus)? Why is there a dove representing the Holy Spirit? Look at this to help you with your thinking.  Sketch a triquetra and come up with your own ideas of drawings to represent the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. Give reasons for what you have chosen. Do this in your books. 

 

Monday 20th April 2020 

I hope you've all had a lovely weekend. Start your day with some Joe Wicks, Kids Zumba, yoga or your own exercise. I'd love to see how you are keeping active on ClassDojo. 

SPaG: Here are your spellings for this week. Aim to complete one of the spelling activities on your weekly spelling activity sheet each day to help you learn your spellings for Friday. 

Today we are going to think about something called personification. Personification is a figure of speech where an object, idea or animal is given human qualities. For example: The old piano looked tired and sad as it sat in the scrapyard. Personification can make writing more exciting. Watch this clip and then have a go at matching together these jumbled sentences. Write them in your books and think of at least 5 of your own. Re-read 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth and identify and write down examples where he used personification. What effect does this have?  

Maths: 

Year 5: Today we are going to be working out approximate areas of shapes that are irregular. We are going to look at irregular shapes and count the full squares in them, then count up the part-covered squares to give an overall approximate area. Have a go at this activity with cm squares. As a challenge, take a small amount of water (about 10ml) and gently pour this onto a clear surface (with your parents permission) and use your ruler to approximate the area the water takes up in square cm. 

Year 6: Today we are going to continue to calculate the area of triangles. Remember the formula for calculating the area of a triangle is (base/width x height)÷ 2 Have a go at this activity first. Then have a go at one of the sections of this activity. Choose your level of challenge; tricky, very tricky or very very tricky. 

History: In history we are going to start our topic on the Benin civilisation. Take a look at our knowledge organiser in the subject section of this page below. We are going to start by thinking about chronology today by doing some timeline work. I would like you to use this and this document to create your history timeline. It would be great if you included some extras on your timeline such as when you were born. You could attach some pieces of paper together to make your timeline. Think carefully about how you will organise your timeline as some of these periods in history may overlap. You might choose to put world history above the line and British history below the line. Think carefully about dates when placing the periods of history so your lines/bars are of appropriate size for example the Ancient Egyptians would span a larger proportion of your timeline that the Tudors would. Will you colour code periods? Whatever you decide make sure it is clear on your timeline. Where does the Benin civilisation fit into history? Before or after the Ancient Egyptians? What was the timespan? 

Friday 17th April 2020

Happy Friday everyone! It's great to see your work on ClassDojo and what you've been up to. Well done! 

Hope you enjoyed the Zumba kids yesterday! Remember to get yourselves active today too!

 

SPaG: Have one last practise of your weekly spellings and ask an adult to test you on them. Ask an adult to read you each spelling word as part of a sentence for you to write down. Remember that beautiful cursive handwriting! 

 

Maths: Have a go at playing 'Guardians: Defenders of Mathematica' for a little while to warm up your brain. It's a great new game! You might love it so much you play it this weekend for a while! Remember to keep up your good work on times table rockstars and Prodigy. 

Year 5: Today you're going to work out the areas of compound shapes. A compound shape is a shape that is made up of two or more basic shapes. To work out the area of a compound shape you need to 'split' the shape and work out the area in parts. Once you've done this add them together to get the area of the whole shape. The area should be the same no matter how you split up the shape. Sometimes you might need to use what information you already have about the shape to calculate any missing lengths. Here is a useful video. Have a go at this activity. Choose your level of challenge. 

Year 6: Yesterday you were working out/estimating areas of triangles by counting squares. Today we are going to use a different method to work out the area of a triangle. To calculate the area of a triangle you need to multiply its height and width together then half it. The formula for this is (h x w) ÷ 2. The end of this video has a useful example. Here is your activity. 

 

English: It's been fantastic to see how engaged you are with the poem 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth. Re-read the poem and answer the following questions in full sentences in your books: 

  • Can you write a summary of the poem in no more that 30 words? 
  • What is the meaning or message of the poem? Why did William Wordsworth write it? What is he trying to say? 
  • What is a stanza? How many are there in this poem?
  • Has William Wordsworth used any similes or metaphors in the poem? Highlight and label them. What effect do they have? Refer back to the work you did on Tuesday to remind yourself of what a similes and metaphors are. 
  • What is a rhyme scheme? Click here to remind yourself. Has William Wordsworth used a rhyme scheme in this poem? Why? Identify and label the rhyme scheme. 

 

Science: Our Science topic this half term is called 'Living things and their Habitats' and we are going to learn about life cycles. Have a look at the knowledge organiser in the science section below. 

All living things need to make more of themselves so that their species does not die out. Reproduction is the process by which new living things are made. We are going to think about some of the ways that different plants reproduce. Watch this clip and complete the activities on the page. Can you sort which plants are pollinated by the wind and which are pollinated by insects here? Draw the table in your books if you can't print. 

Do you have any flowering plants in your garden? Choose one and have a close look. Can you see the stigma, pollen, stamen, anther, ovule and nectar? Choose one and ask an adult what the name of the plant is. If you’re not sure research it to identify its name. Find out how it is pollinated. Draw a sketch of the flowering plant and label its parts.

 

Keep working away on your DT projects over the next few days. I'm so excited to see them on ClassDojo when they're finished! 

 

I'm very proud of you all! Have a lovely weekend!

 

Thursday 16th April 2020

It's great some of you have started to use ClassDojo keep it up! Those of you who haven't used it yet try to upload something each day! 

Get yourself active this morning. Zumba kids has some great dance videos to follow if you fancy something different. Make sure you do a little warm up first though as they dance quite rigorously from the set off! 

Maths: Warm up with a daily ten mental maths activity (link above). Make sure you use times table rockstars to improve your rapid recall of times tables. They have a mobile app if you would prefer to use that. I'd like you to complete at least one of the fraction activities on ClassroomSecretsKids for your year group as revision. Make sure you remember to write the name of the activity you do in your books so you remember which one you've done. 

Year 5: You're going to be calculating the area of rectangles today. Area is the amount of space that is inside a shape. Because it is an amount of space it has to be measured in

squares. If the shape is measured in cm, then the area would be measured in square cm or cm2 . We multiply the length by the width.    

                  area of rectangle image 2

The area of this rectangle is 5x3=15 squares.rectangle example

Have a go at this activity

Year 6: We are going to learn about calculating the area of a triangle today. One way we can calculate the area of a triangle is by counting the squares in it. If these triangles are drawn on cm paper, then I calculate triangle A to have an area of 8cm². Can you calculate/estimate the areas of the other triangles? Write your answers in your book. Here is a challenge!Area of Right Triangles

 

English: We are going to look at one of William Wordsworth's most well known poems called 'Daffodils' today. I'd like you to start by listening to the poem and then reading it yourself a couple of times. Stick the poem in your book if you can print a copy of it or write it if not. This poem was written over 200 years ago and is still loved today. To help us understand the poem we need to identify words we do not understand. Highlight or underline the words you don't understand and ask an adult to help you work out their meaning. Add notes to the margin so you remember what they mean. Daffodils are planted in abundance in Cockermouth to commemorate this poem. Daffodils are in flower at this time of year and you will likely see lots on your walks or perhaps in your gardens. In this poem William Wordsworth's mood is lifted by the daffodils. What do you see in nature that lifts your mood? 

 

Art: Sticking with the subject of daffodils, I would like you to use this website to aid you in drawing a daffodil of your own. Follow each step carefully. As a challenge could you draw a bunch of daffodils 'beside the lake, beneath the trees, fluttering and dancing in the breeze' as William Wordsworth describes seeing them in his poem? 

 

French: I'd like you to get your books at the ready and watch this video on clothes. Write down as much of the vocabulary as you can in your books with English and French translation. Maybe you could use a different colour for each language. To help with translation the Collins online dictionary is a great resource to use. 

 

Keep working away on your Wordsworth House projects. I can't wait to see them! 

Wednesday 15th April 2020 

Happy Wednesday! Start your day with some exercise such as following Joe Wicks or some cosmic kids yoga. Or even some exercise of your own!

Remember to keep practising your spellings each day ready for an adult to test you on them on Friday. Let me know your scores on the Classdojo page!

 

Maths: We are going to continue our work from yesterday on perimeter and area. Did you manage the challenges yesterday? 

Year 5: You're going to calculate the perimeter of shapes that have missing lengths. How can you work out the missing lengths in order to calculate the perimeter of the shape? Sometimes we need to use the other lengths we know to work out the missing ones.  Here

Year 6: Here are your activities. Start by completing the revision activity on ClassroomSecretsKids as a warm up. Don't forget about the problem solving question at the bottom. Who is right? How do you know? 

 

English: In English we are going to explore poetry. We will look at two poets; a classical poet and a modern poet. We will start by learning about our classical poet William Wordsworth!

Today I would like you to do some research and find out as much about his life and work as you can. Whilst you do your research make some notes and then organise these notes into paragraphs to create a bibliography. Here are some features of a bibliography for you to check you're on the right track (metaphor!). This and this site have some good information on him. Complete your bibliography in your books with today's date. It would be great if you included a picture(s) of him - printed or sketched. 

 

DT: We are going to make a start on our DT project today. I'd like you to make a model of Wordsworth house. Wordsworth house is a popular tourist attraction in Cockermouth which is ran by the National Trust. Some of you may have even visited before! What can you find out about the house? You're going to get creative and make a model using a cardboard box and other materials that you have available to you. Ask your parents to help you find a cardboard box that you can use for this project. If you don't have one don't panic you could use something else. Start by looking at pictures of Wordsworth house. Here is a link to a map of Main Street Cockermouth. Could you drop the 'little yellow man' on Main street and try and find Wordsworth house. 

When planning your project start by making a list of materials you have available to you. Think carefully about details such as how many windows Wordsworth House has. Does the front of the property look the same as the back? Draw a labelled sketch in your books how you hope your project will turn out. Wordsworth House has some impressive gardens which you could try and include. How could you make stairs and flooring on the inside. Could you make furniture? 

Be creative and have fun making this. Ask your parents to help when they can. Work on this for some time each day and aim to have pictures posted on the ClassDojo page by Monday. I can't wait to see them! 

Tuesday 14th April 2020

I hope you and your families have had a lovely Easter! It's been amazing how many of you have shared the exciting things you've been up to with me. Well done to those of you who have been polishing your times tables on times tables Rockstars and Prodigy! I'm tracking your progress so keep going! 

Start today with some exercise, whether this be joining in with Joe Wicks or some Yoga. Cosmic kids Yoga has some good videos and you can select difficulty level. 

We now have classroom Dojo set up so you can communicate with me and others in your class on there. 

SPaG: Here are you spellings for this week. Remember to practise your spellings each day using the spelling activities sheet you have. Choose a spelling activity to do and complete this in your book each day. Remember your beautiful cursive handwriting! 

Today's SPaG is going to be all about similes and metaphors.

A simile is the comparison of one thing to another thing e.g. My dog is as brave as a lion. Similes use 'like' or 'as' in them. 

A metaphor is a word or phrase used to describe something as if it were something else e.g. Tom ran at lightning speed.

Have a look at this page. Watch the video and have a go at the quiz. Listen to this catchy song. Throughout the song the superheroes give examples of similes and metaphors as speech bubbles. As you watch the video, pause it to write them down as a list in your books. It would be best if you watch the video first before you start doing this. Draw a table in your book with a column for similes and a column for metaphors and organise the list into the correct column. Now come up with at least 5 of your own! Do you or your family say similes or metaphors in your everyday language without realising? This could be: 'What a nightmare!' or 'Hurry up slow coach!' 

As revision I would like you to complete the Spring revision assessment activities on classroom secrets for your year group. I will log on and check your scores. 

Maths: 

Warm your brains up by doing some daily ten activities (link above). 

Year 5: We are going to be calculating perimeters today. To calculate the perimeter of a rectangle we need to add its lengths and widths together L + W + L + W. Have a go at this activity (choose your level of challenge) in your books and then have a go at measuring the perimeter of some rectangular objects in your house e.g. a chopping board or a radiator (not if it's hot!). Feel free to put a picture on class dojo for others to see! 

Year 6: We are going to be calculating perimeter and area today. To work out the perimeter of a shape you need to add its lengths and widths together (for a rectangle this would be L + W + L + W). To calculate the area of a rectangle you need to multiply its length by width L x W. It is sometimes necessary to partition (split up) a shape into parts and work out their areas and add these together to work out the total area of the shape. Complete this activity and challenge. As a challenge could you work with an adult to calculate the perimeter and area of a room in your house? Or your garden? Feel free to put a picture on class dojo for others to see! 

RE: 

This half term in RE we are going to be thinking about why the Holy Sprit is important to Christians. Sharpen your pencil and get ready to sketch a triquetra! Click here

 

Easter Holidays

You've all worked so hard this week and I'm really impressed with you all. I want you all to have a very relaxing and special Easter. Here are some activities: 

  • Keep active! This could be by taking part in the daily PE from Joe Wicks or playing games in your garden. 
  • Keep reading! If you read a book and it's fantastic please let your friends know about it. Take some time to read the Easter Story here
  • Ask your parents to share some photo albums from the past with you. Sit down and chat about what it was like when your parents and other family members were younger. 
  • Try to do something each day to help your parents. This could be: hoovering, washing up, mopping, sweeping, tidying your room, organising things. 
  • Get crafty! Have a go at some Easter crafts. Here are some ideas. 
  • Have a go at some of the activities on the weekly additional grids I printed and put in your home learning folders.
  • Keep your times tables knowledge sharp by going on Times table rockstars. Have a go at some of the other learning activities below. It's brilliant how much some of you are using prodigy and classroom secrets for kids. 
  • Ask your parents if you can do some baking together.
  • Keep up your diary writing! These diaries will prove to be invaluable when it comes to looking back and reflecting on this time in our lives. 
  • Sit in your garden and make a note or sketch any wildlife you can find. The RSPB has a bird identifier tool and here is an activity sheet. 
  • Could you build a bug hotel in your garden? 

Friday 27th March 2020 

 Good morning and happy Friday! We've reached the end of our first week of home learning. Give yourselves a pat on the back for working so hard! Give your parents a pat too! 

Maths:  Here is video which outlines the differences between metric and imperial measures. Here is a bitesize page on imperial measures. Here and here are some useful conversion tables. 

Can you do some measuring at home in imperial measures?

Can you find something in your house that is exactly 1 inch? What is the biggest object in your house? How many feet in length is it? The longest object in my house is my sofa which is 9 feet 2 inches long. 

Can you use a measuring jug and work out how to fill your sink with exactly a gallon of water? 

In your books: 

Can you put the following metric and imperial measurements of capacity in ascending order: gallon, pint, centilitre, millilitre, litre. 

Can you put the following metric and imperial measurements of weight in ascending order: kilogram, tonne, pound, stone, ounce, gram.

Can you put the following metric and imperial measurements of length in ascending order: metre, kilometre, centimetre, mile, yard, inch, foot, millimetres. 

Year 5 converting units end of block assessment and answers

Year 6 converting measures end of block assessment and answers

Challenge

English: Ask an adult to test you on your ten spellings you got on Monday. Ask them to read the word in a sentence for you to copy down.

Today we are going to refresh our memories on antonyms and synonyms. 

Remember an antonyms are opposites e.g. large and small (Imagine ANTS running in opposite directions). Remember a synonym is a word or phrase that has the same or nearly the same meaning as another word or phrase e.g. smile and grin. 

There are two antonym and two synonym matching games to play on classroom secrets for kids. Log onto the website and go to the GPS section for your year group. I'll keep an eye out for your scores. 

Make a table of antonym and synonyms in your books. Aim for at least 10 examples of each. 

Computing: Continuing to think about our homes, I would like you think about what kind of home you would like when you are older. I would like you to design your DREAM house. I would like you to use software to create your dream house. If you have paint software you could ask your parents if you can use that. If you don't already have any drawing software ask your parents to help you find alternative drawing software or app. You MUST not download or use anything without your parents permission and supervision. If you are unable to use software then you can do this in your books. I would love your parents to send me your creations.  

Thursday 26th March 2020

 I have spoken to most of you on the phone and it is great to hear what you've been up to. You're all engaging with this class page and a lot of you are doing extra things like going on Prodigy, Times tables rock stars and some of the other links above. Have a look at the 'useful websites' of our school website where lots of great things are being added. It's nice to hear so many of you are staying active with Joe Wicks at 9am. Well done everyone and keep it up! 

Maths: Today we are going to be working on kilometres (km), metres (m), centimetres (cm) and millimetres (mm). Remember that: 

1km = 1000m 

1m = 100cm 

1cm = 10mm 

Have a look at this website. There is a useful clip and some questions to answer further down the page. 

Grab the ruler you were given in your folders and get measuring. Pick 5 objects that you can measure with the ruler and write some conversion sentences. Write these in your book. For example: 

My phone 14cm in length so it is 140mm. If my phone is 14cm then it is 0.14m. If my phone is 0.14m then it is 0.00014km. 

If you have a metre measuring tape in your house it would be great to use that so some of the 5 objects you choose could be on the larger side. 

As a challenge could you measure your bedroom or another room in your house? Write this in your book along with a sketch of it (not to scale!). 

English: Today I would like us all to refresh our knowledge of apostrophes. Remember we use apostrophes to indicate possession for nouns e.g. That is Roy's dog. We also use them for contractions e.g. That is - that's. Have a look at this and this which looks at using apostrophes for possession. Have a look at this and this which looks at using apostrophes for contractions. What is the rule for using an apostrophe in it's

Choose one of the following: 

  • Design an apostrophe poster. Explain when to use them and give examples. 
  • Have a go at coming up with an apostrophe quiz. You might want to come up with some sentences that need fixed because there is an apostrophe used incorrectly. Ask someone in your house to have a go at your quiz. 

Science: As we are spending more time in our homes than usual, I would like you to brainstorm some energy saving tips for our homes. Make an eco guide or a poster full of useful things we can do in our homes to be more environmentally friendly. Once you have made your guide or poster put it somewhere visible in your house so that it reminds your family. A good idea might be to put it on your fridge. One example of a tip could be to cut open your tube of toothpaste to scoop every last bit of it out so none is wasted. Another tip could be to cut up old socks and turn them into dusters rather than throwing them away. Research lots of tips for your guide or poster. You might get some ideas here.

Reading: Lots of you are reading for pleasure at home and some of you are listening to David Walliams read one of his stories once a day (link above). In addition to this, I would like you to to do some reading comprehension on the circulatory system. This is on the year 5 section of the classroom secrets for kids website which you can access with your username and password. This will help refresh your memory of our recent science work. 

Wednesday 25th March 2020 

 Good morning everyone! Hope you're tuning in live to the daily PE lesson from Joe Wicks. I hope you all enjoyed the elevenses with the World of David Walliams yesterday for 20ish minutes. Try and listen again today. Remember the link is above. 

Maths: Today you're going to be converting between litres (l) and millilitres (ml). Remember 1000ml = 1l. Do you have a measuring jug in your house? If you do then use the jug to have a go at measuring the capacity of different objects in your home such as a pan or a bucket. If you don't have a measuring jug you could use an empty bottle and read the label on it to see its capacity. I've used an empty 2l lemonade bottle to measure the capacity of my sink. It took 15 bottles to fill my sink so the capacity of my sink is 30 litres. Have a watch of this video. There are some challenging questions at the end so remember to pause the video while you work them out. 

Year 5 activity

Year 6 activity 

English: Continue and complete your newspaper article today. Self-assess your work by checking you have included the features from the bullet point list yesterday. Use a different colour to correct any mistakes and make any amendments. Ask an adult to read your article and ask them for some recommendations. I bet they are very amusing! 

RE: Imagine that you are a person who lives in Jerusalem at the time of the resurrection of Jesus. A newspaper reporter who works for 'The Jerusalem Times' has asked if he can interview you.

Here are his questions: 

  • What can you tell me about Jesus?
  • Did you ever see Jesus? Where? What was he like? Who were his friends? 
  • Why do you think Jesus was crucified? Who was there? 
  • What do you know about his resurrection? Who discovered his body was missing from the tomb? How did you feel when you found out? What did Jesus do when he came back? What do you think this will mean for Christians? 
  • Do you think Jesus will be remembered? How? Why? 

Write your answers to these questions in as much detail as you can. 

Tuesday 24th March 2020 

Start your day with the daily PE lesson Live at 9am from Joe Wicks the body coach. See the link above. I thought this was exhausting yesterday so I am hoping he will help me get fitter if I keep doing this every morning! 

Maths: Today you are going to be converting between grams and kilograms. Remember 1000g = 1kg. Start by watching this BBC clip which has the Chuckle Brothers solving a problem. Have a look around your house and list 5 things in your book that you estimate would weigh <1kg and 5 things that you think would weigh >1kg. If you have a set of weighing scales in your kitchen, try weighing some items.  Pick some pairs of items to compare their weights using < > or =. An example of this could be:

Phone 143g < Book 231g

If you don't have any scales don't worry. You can find some things in your kitchen that have the weight in g/kg on them such as a bag of rice or washing powder and compare those items. 

Year 5 activity. Do at least questions 1,2 and 3. 

Year 6 activity

English: You're going to do some more imaginative writing today and tomorrow! There has been a giraffe spotted in a field in Beckermet! Here's a picture of the lost fellow. You need to write a newspaper report on this strange occurrence. Spend some time doing this today and some time tomorrow. Aim to include the following features: 

  • A catchy headline (remember alliteration can be great). Don't forget the name of the newspaper and the reporter's name!  
  • A subtitle which gives a bit more information about what the article is about
  • Direct and reported speech. Aim for 2 or 3 quotes from eye witnesses or an official. Aim for the quote to reflect the person who is speaking, for example a young child would say something different to a member of the police force or the local MP 
  • A sketch with a caption 
  • A first paragraph(s) which answers the questions: who? what? when? where? why? 
  • Write about the main events in chronological order 
  • Written in the third person and in past tense

Art: You are going to sketch a giraffe! You might want to do this activity first so you can use your sketch in your newspaper article. Get your pencil nice and sharp and use this video to create a fantastic sketch. You will need to pause the video very often to keep up. 

PSHCE:  Carrying on with your learning about money, I would like you to think about the difference between essential and non-essential costs/spending. Make a list of 5 things you think are absolutely essential to spend money on and 5 things you think are non-essential. Will this be the same when you are an adult? Talk to your family about essential and non-essential costs. 

Remember to work on your weekly spellings and read for pleasure! 

Take regular breaks. Have a relax by clicking on the link to elevenses with the world of David Walliams. Enjoy 20 minutes listening to him read a story from the World's Worst Children at 11am each day. 

 

Monday 23rd March 2020

Start your day with the daily PE lesson LIVE at 9am from Joe Wicks the body coach. See the link above. 

Weekly spellings for week beginning 23.03.20. Please make a note of these spellings in your books and practise these throughout the week. Choose an activity from the spellings activity sheet I gave you. Ask an adult to test you on them on Friday. 

Maths: This week we are going to be working on converting measurements. We will start my converting 12-hour times to 24-hour times. Spend some time playing on this telling the time game. Select the option of the 24-hour clock and see how many you can get in the time limit. Here are the year 5 and year 6 activities to have a go at in your books. 

English:  Hopefully you managed to plan and write your first draft of Part Two of 'Clockwork' by Philip Pullman. This should be an extended piece of writing. Proof read it yourself then ask an adult to check it for you. Ask an adult to identify 5 things that are great about your writing. Has it got a range of punctuation correctly? Is your handwriting cursive? Have you used paragraphs correctly? Have you used some extraordinary vocabulary? Have you built up suspense and tension? Aim to make at least five correction/additions to your version of Part Two and write out your final version. Philip Pullman included some illustrations in this book so remember to add in some sketches to your version. 

Topic: Today I would like you to research and compare the climates of the four countries we have been looking at: England (UK), France, Brazil and Mexico. I would like you to find a definition of 'climate' using a paper/online dictionary and write this in your book. I would then like you to research the average annual rainfall and temperature for each of the countries and create a bar chart showing these. Write some sentences to summarise and compare e.g. The warmest country is... The range of temperatures between the four countries is...etc. Use the fun kids website to learn about climate zones and write down which climate zone(s) the UK, France, Brazil and Mexico would fall into and why. The NASA climate kids site is an interesting site.  

 

Thursday 19th March 2020

 English: This week we are continuing our work on 'Clockwork' by Philip Pullman. We have read to the end of Part 1 together and I would like you to write Part 2. We were left in such suspense at the end of Part 1. Poor Gretl, sitting by the fire...unaware Sir Ironsoul was approaching her with his sword from behind! Plan your writing carefully before writing out your own take on Part 2. What will happen to Gretl? Will Karl use Sir Ironsoul as his figure in the town clock? Will Fritz finish the story? Has Dr Kalmenius arrived in the little German town to find a new heart for Prince Otto? Don't forget your punctuation . Aa , ? ! " ( ) - ' ... 

Maths: We have reached the end of our maths unit this week. Year 5 have become experts at decimals and year 6 have become algebra whizzes. Have a go at the year 5 and year 6 end of block assessment. Here are year 5 answers and year 6 answers

RE: In RE we are looking at the poem 'Heaven' by Steve Turner. We are also exploring and comparing what Christians, Buddhists, Muslims and Hindus believe about life after death. 

Science: In Science we are learning about healthy lifestyles. Make a brochure or a leaflet to educate people on how to have a healthy lifestyle. Include a section on: healthy eating (keywords: carbohydrates, protein, fibre, fats, vitamins, minerals, water); the importance of exercise and ways to do it; tips for a healthy mind. 

Please take a look at our curriculum overview for this year 2019-2020. 

Here is our English curriculum overview for this year 2019-2020

Here is our class weekly timetable.

Summer Term

In English we are going to start by exploring poetry. We are going to study a classic and a modern poet (William Wordsworth and Spike Milligan). We will learn about the lives of these poets and examine some of their famous poems. We will learn a poem off by heart and look at poetic techniques they use. We will create some poetry of our own!  

We are going to study some classical fiction. I won't reveal this just yet! We will complete lots of fun and creative writing this Summer term! 

As a fun DT project we are going to make models of Wordsworth House! Wordsworth house is a popular tourist destination in Cockermouth. You'll need a cardboard box and lots of creativity! 

In Maths we are going to study the following topics: 

  • Perimeter area and volume 
  • Statistics 
  • Properties of shape 
  • Position and direction

We will continue to polish our times table knowledge. I will be setting some regular times table inverse operation challenges too! 

In History we are going to learn all about the Benin civilisation. We will look at the changes from ancient to modern day Benin. We will explore the ancient Benin culture and religion. We will explore the ancient Benin kings and why it was such a successful kingdom. We will examine the contrasts and influence of Britain. It's going to be fascinating! Benin knowledge organiser. 

In R.E. we will examine: 

  • Why is the Holy Spirit important to Christians?
  • What do different faiths teach about care and respect to others?  

In Science our topic is going to be 'Living things and their Habitats' in which we will learn about life cycles. Living things and their Habitats knowledge organiser

In PSHCE we will look at: 

  • Keeping fit  
  • Healthy minds 

In French we are going to learn how we might get to know someone by speaking French. We will learn how to:

  • Greet people
  • Ask someone their name and tell them ours
  • Ask someone how they are and tell them how we are
  • Talk to someone about school - favourite subjects, days of the week, months of the year 
  • Talk to someone about our hobbies

In Music we will look at the Anthology of Fantastic Zoology - Sprite; A Bao A Qu by Mason Bates which was inspired by the 'Book of Imaginary Beings' by Jorge Luis Borges. We will create art-work, poetry and music inspired by a piece of orchestral music. 

We are going to do lots of activities based around Music to help keep our spirits up! We will do some Music lyric comprehensions and study famous musicians and music genres! 

Homework

Children in year 5 and 6 will receive their homework on Mondays and this is expected to be returned to school on Fridays. Children are expected to read to an adult five times per week in order to 'strive-for-5'. Please record reading within planners.

Homework will include a set of spellings with handwriting, and an additional piece which will usually be either maths or English related. Children will make a note of their homework in their planners.